Caswell County Genealogy
 

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Brown, Bedford

Brown, Bedford

Male 1795 - 1870  (75 years)

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  • Name Brown, Bedford  [1, 2, 3
    Birth 6 Jun 1795  Locust Hill Township, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Reference Number 6027 
    Death 6 Dec 1870  Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Burial Brown Family Cemetery, Locust Hill, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I5944  Caswell County
    Last Modified 13 Oct 2023 

    Father Brown, Colonel Jethro,   b. 23 Oct 1766   d. 10 Nov 1828 (Age 62 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Williamson, Lucy,   b. 18 Mar 1767   d. Oct 1834 (Age 67 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Marriage 28 May 1788  Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Reference Number 44129 
    Notes 
    • Marriage Bond Record
      Groom: Jethro Brown
      Bride: Lucey Williamson
      Bond Date: 28 May 1788
      Bondsman/Witness: John Buchanan
      Location: Caswell County, North Carolina
      Source: Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1981) at 10.
    Family ID F3114  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Glenn, Mary Lumpkin,   b. 22 Feb 1798, Pittsylvania County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this locationd. 1864, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 65 years) 
    Marriage 13 Jul 1816  Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Reference Number 44136 
    Notes 
    • The marriage bond is dated 6 July 1816, but the marriage apparently took place 13 July 1816.

      Marriage Bond Record
      Groom: Bedford Brown
      Bride: Mary Glenn
      Bond Date: 6 July 1816
      Bondsman/Witness: Griffin Gunn
      Location: Caswell County, North Carolina
      Source: Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1981) at 9.

      North Carolina Marriage Collection, 1741-2004
      Name: Bedford Brown
      Spouse: Mary Glenn
      Marriage Date: 6 Jul 1816 (probably bond date)
      Marriage County: Caswell
      Marriage State: North Carolina
      Source Vendor: County Court Records - FHL # 0478484-0478488
      Source: County Court Records at Yanceyville, NC & Family H
    Children 
     1. Brown, William,   b. 21 Dec 1817, Halifax County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
    +2. Brown, Livingston,   b. 6 Mar 1820, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this locationd. 1895 (Age 74 years)  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
    +3. Brown, Dr. Bedford Jr. M.D.,   b. 17 Jan 1823, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this locationd. 13 Sep 1897, Alexandria, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 74 years)  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
     4. Brown, Wilson Glenn,   b. 31 Aug 1825  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
     5. Brown, Isabella Virginia,   b. 21 Apr 1829   d. 1870, Halifax County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 40 years)  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
    +6. Brown, Laura Glenn,   b. 19 Apr 1834, Halifax County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this locationd. 25 Nov 1910, Taylors Creek, Liberty County, Georgia Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 76 years)  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
     7. Brown, Rosalie,   b. 24 Jul 1837, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
    Family ID F3113  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart
    Last Modified 13 Oct 2023 

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBirth - 6 Jun 1795 - Locust Hill Township, Caswell County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarriage - 13 Jul 1816 - Caswell County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDeath - 6 Dec 1870 - Caswell County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBurial - - Brown Family Cemetery, Locust Hill, Caswell County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Bedford Brown
    Bedford Brown Envelope
    Rose Hill

    Documents
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #1
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #1
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #2
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #2
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #3
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #3
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #4
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #4
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #5
    Bedford Brown Civil War Pardon #5
    Alleged Senator Bedford Brown Signature
    Alleged Senator Bedford Brown Signature

    Newspapers
    Bedford Brown Re-elected US Senator. Richmond Enquirer (Richmond, VA), 25 November 1834
    Bedford Brown NC Senate. Weekly State Journal (Raleigh, NC), 26 Dec 1860
    Bedford Brown. A Political Reminiscence. The Daily Journal (Wilmington, NC), 16 June 1866
    John W. Stephens and Bedford Brown. NC Senate Race. The Weekly Standard (Raleigh, NC), 26 Aug 1868

  • Notes 
    • Bedford Brown (1795-1870)

      Senator Bedford Brown (1795-1870)

      Alleged Bedford Brown Signature

      Alleged Senator Bedford Brown Signature

      (click on photograph for larger image)
      _______________

      Biographical Sketch

      rosehill2Rose Hill

      Civil War Pardon Petition

      Captain Ball on the Stephens Murder, Daily Record (Greensboro, North Carolina), 2 and 3 February 1911.

      Jones, Houston G. Bedford Brown: State Rights Unionist. Carrollton, Georgia: West Georgia College, 1955.
      _______________

      "A North Carolina Congressman who is little-known is Bedford Brown of Caswell County, who was presiding officer of the Senate in 1829. Brown was a personal friend and admirer of President Andrew Jackson. Friends said they looked alike."

      Dean, Earl. "Early Tar Heel Senators," The State, 28 April 1951, pp. 3 & 17.
      _______________

      Caswell County's Bedford Brown became a United States Senator in 1829 as a result of Senator Branch resigning to accept the position of Secretary of Navy in President Andrew Jackson's cabinet.

      At the time, US senators were selected by state legislatures. Brown's election was not without controversy, and he was attacked after being chosen. A Raleigh newspaper suggested Brown resign and that county grand juries consider him and ask Brown to resign. The basis for all this is unknown. However, his defenders and supporters came out in droves. Brown was again elected to the US Senate in 1835.

      When Bedford Brown was elected by the NC legislature to the US Senate, he was a NC State Senator, having been appointed to fill the vacancy left by the death of Bartlett Yancey (1785-1828).
      _______________

      Caswell County History

      In 1834, Caswell County's Bedford Brown (1795-1870) was again selected as one of North Carolina's two United States senators.
      Did Caswell County produce another US senator after Bedford Brown?
      _______________

      Bedford Brown, United States senator, was born in Caswell county, N. C., in 1795. In 1815 he was elected to the North Carolina house of commons, and was re-elected in 1816, 1817, and 1823. In 1828 he was made a state senator (appointed to the seat held by Bartlett Yancey, Jr.), serving a second term by re-election. He was elected to the United States senate in 1829, as successor to Senator Branch, who resigned to accept the portfolio of the navy in Jackson's cabinet. He was re-elected in 1835, and, resigning his seat in 1840, because of his inability to conscientiously obey the instructions of the general assembly of North Carolina, was elected to the state senate in 1842, and in 1843 was an unsuccessful candidate for U. S. senator. For a time he resided in Missouri, but afterwards returned to Caswell county, N. C., where he died Dec. 6, 1870.

      Source: Ancestry.com: Ancestry.com. Biographies of Notable Americans, 1904 [database online]. Orem, UT: MyFamily.com, Inc., 1997
      _______________

      "Hon. Bedford Brown, late U.S. Senator from this State [North Carolina], is the opposition candidate [Democratic] for the [North Carolina] State Senate from Caswell County."

      Wilmington Chronicle (Wilmington, NC), 25 May 1842.
      _______________

      The following is placed here because it remains in the formal Congressional biography of Senator Bedford Brown. However, it is incorrect in many respects. Brown attended the University of North Carolina for only one year and then, in 1815, when only twenty years old, was elected to the North Carolina House of Commons. The Congressional biography even displays an incorrect photograph, that of the son of Senator Brown, Dr. Bedford Brown, Jr., M.D. For a correct description of the life of Senator Bedford Brown see: Bedford Brown: States Rights Unionist, Houston G. Jones (1955); and Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Vol. 1 (A-C), William S. Powell, Editor (1979).

      Brown, Bedford, a Senator from North Carolina; born in Caswell County, N.C., near Greensboro, June 6, 1795; was graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1813; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1815 but did not practice; engaged as a planter; elected to the House of Commons of North Carolina in 1815, 1816, 1817, and 1823; member of the State senate in 1828 and 1829; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John Branch; reelected in 1835 and served from December 9, 1829, until November 16, 1840, when he resigned, because he would not obey the instructions of the general assembly of North Carolina; again elected to the State senate in 1842; unsuccessful candidate for election to the United States Senate in 1842; moved to Missouri in 1843; subsequently moved to Virginia and built a place known as Waverly; returned to North Carolina and engaged in agricultural pursuits; again a member of the State senate in 1858 and 1860; delegate to the reconstruction convention in 1865; again elected to the State senate in 1868, but was not permitted to take his seat; delegate to the Democratic National Convention at New York City in 1868; died at "Rose Hill," Caswell County, N.C., near Greensboro, December 6, 1870; interment in the family cemetery at "Rose Hill."

      Source: U.S. Congress, Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950), p.897.
      _______________

      On page 93 of An Inventory of Historic Architecture: Caswell County, North Carolina, Ruth Little-Stokes (1979) is a photograph of the Bedford Brown House (Rose Hill) (Locust Hill Township), accompanied by the following commentary:

      Photo 84. Bedford Brown House (Rose Hill) ca. 1802. Handsome 2-story frame early Federal House built by Jethro Brown, who kept a tavern here [nearby] where an early intellectual society met. It was the seat of Bedford Brown, one of Caswell County's best known statesmen, a leader of the Southern Democratic Party who opposed secession in 1860. Brown added an elaborate late Federal parlor, which features a remarkably complete survival of original marbelized woodwork, wallpaper,and carpet. [National Register]
      _______________

      Mary Lumpkin Glenn married the Honorable Bedford Brown of Rose Hill, Caswell County. She, like her mother and three sisters, attended Salem Academy. Her husband was a state legislator, later a U.S. Senator, and was a vigorous opponent of secession. They were the parents of at least two sons, Bedford, a doctor, and Livingston, a lawyer, scholar linquist. Rose Hill, built by Colonel Jethro Brown in 1800, was given to his son, along with 1000 acres and 100 slaves, as a wedding gift. After a wedding trip to England, Mrs. Brown supervised the planting of the grounds with hundreds of rose bushes and more than 2000 boxwoods. The estate still is owned and occupied by the Brown family.

      Source: "The Original Bloomsburg-1797" (Article in The Record-Advertiser, 15 June 1972, by Kenneth H. Cook).
      _______________

      Bedford Brown (of "Rose Hill" fame)(1795-1870) married Mary Lumpkin Glenn (1798-1865) July 13, 1816. Bedford Brown's father was rather generous in his wedding gifts, which included:

      Jethro Brown of Caswell County to son Bedford Brown of same, for love and affection, 502 acres on Moon's Creek embracing the seat lately occupied by Jethro Brown on the main road adjacent to the property of Rice, Swift, and Brooks. 18 December 1817. Witnesses: J. W. Brown, John E. Brown.

      Caswell County, North Carolina
      Deed Book T, Page 200
      _______________

      Brown married Mary Lumpkin Glenn on 6 July 1816, and they had seven children: Livingston, Bedford, Jr., Wilson Glenn, Isabella Virginia, Virginia, Laura, and Rosalie. Brown was buried on the grounds at Rose Hill.
      _______________

      On May 4, 1861, the Caswell County Justices called a session of the Caswell County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions to appoint judges to hold an election on May 13, 1861, to select delegates for a state convention to meet on May 20, 1861. Caswell County candidates for election to the convention were: Hon. Bedford Brown (511 votes); Capt. John A. Graves (493 votes); Dr. J. E. Williamson (448 votes); Hon. S. P. Hill (155 votes); and Richard I. Smith, Esq. (136 votes). Brown and Graves were declared elected, but it was reported that the returns from Dr. Williamson's own precinct were not received in time to be counted. The Convention remained in existence until the Spring of 1862 and held four sessions. Captain Graves resigned on May 23, 1861, to accept a commission in the army, and a new election was held to which Williamson was chosen as his replacement. The Caswell County Court had, on 25 May 1861, ordered "judges to held an election on June 3, 1861, to elect a member to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Captain John A. Graves in the State Convention." The new delegate took his seat on June 10, 1861.

      Source: When the Past Refused to Die: A History of Caswell County North Carolina 1777-1977, William S. Powell (1977).
      _______________

      An Ordinance to dissolve the union between the State of North Carolina and the other States united with her, under the compact of government entitled "The Constitution of the United States."

      We, the people of the State of North Carolina in convention assembled, do declare and ordain, and it is hereby declared and ordained, That the ordinance adopted by the State of North Carolina in the convention of 1789, whereby the Constitution of the United States was ratified and adopted, and also all acts and parts of acts of the General Assembly ratifying and adopting amendments to the said Constitution, are hereby repealed, rescinded, and abrogated.

      We do further declare and ordain, That the union now subsisting between the State of North Carolina and the other States, under the title of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved, and that the State of North Carolina is in full possession and exercise of all those rights of sovereignty which belong and appertain to a free and independent State.

      Done in convention at the city of Raleigh, this the 20th day of May, in the year of our Lord 1861, and in the eighty-fifth year of the independence of said State.

      Representing Caswell County, North Carolina: Bedford Brown (1795-1870); John A. Graves (1822-1864).
      _______________

      Western Carolinian (Salisbury, North Carolina), 2 September 1823

      Election Returns: We learned verbally, that, in Morgan district, Dr. Robert B. Vance is returned to Congress by the casting votes of the Sheriffs -- Vance and Walker each having 1913 votes; three of the Sheriffs voted for Vance, and one for Walker. Bartlett Yancey, and Romulus M. Saunders [Saunders] are elected delegates from Caswell county. Willie P. Mangum, is elected a Representative in Congress from the Raleigh district. Romulus M. Sanders [Saunders] is re-elected to Congress from the Caswell district. Caswell -- B. Yancey, senate; B. Brown and J. Rainey, commons.
      _______________

      Bedford Brown (1795-1870): Not one North Carolinian in a thousand, perhaps, can identify Bedford Brown, though he was one of the most widely known Southern politicians of his day. It remained for Caswell County's Dr. H. G. Jones, North Carolina Archivist, to rescue Brown from oblivion through a thorough monograph of the "state's rights unionist." Brown, a well-to-do planter, was twelve times elected to the legislature, twice to the U. S. Senate, and served in other public posts. He was a friend of the Democratic leaders of his day, including Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren, Franklin Pierce, and James Buchanan.

      The distinctive feature of his life, however, was his strenuous and unsuccessful efforts to preserve both states' rights and the union. Of the influential men of his time, he was one of the few who risked his political future by advising a course so repugnant to partisans in the ante-bellum crises. There was little room left for a man like Brown in those days, and his greatness lies not in what he accomplished, but in a philosophy that time may yet prove pointed to the only way out. Those interested in an account of this neglected Tar Heel are directed to Jones, Houston G. Bedford Brown: State Rights Unionist. Carrollton, Georgia: West Georgia College, 1955.

      Source: A New Geography of North Carolina, Volume IV, Bill Sharpe (1965) at page 1759.
      _______________

      From The Political Graveyard: Brown, Bedford (1795-1870) - of Locust Hill, Caswell County, N.C. Born in Caswell County, N.C., June 6, 1795. Democrat. Member of North Carolina house of commons, 1815-17, 1823; member of North Carolina state senate, 1828-29, 1842, 1858-60; U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1829-40; resigned 1840; delegate to Democratic National Convention from North Carolina, 1860. Died in Caswell County, N.C., December 6, 1870 (age 75 years, 183 days). Interment a private or family graveyard, Caswell County, N.C.
      _______________

      Raleigh, NC: In the 1820s, master craftsman Thomas Day built furniture for U.S. Sen. Bedford Brown and his estate near Yanceyville. Now, more than 180 years later, the family is parting with some of the pieces. Day, a free black man who lived from 1801to 1861, made some of the best furniture in North Carolina during his time. Despite living in the antebellum South, he was so well-respected that white men apprenticed for him. Nine of Day's pieces, including a sofa worth an estimated $2,000 to $4,000, are being sold Saturday starting at 10 a.m. at the Tory Hill Auction House on Hillsborough Street near the State Fairgrounds. Seven of the nine pieces come from Sen. Brown's estate, Rose Hill, where the furniture has resided since it was built.

      "The house is still so full of original furniture and pieces," said Robert Brown, a direct descendent of the senator Brown said his family decided to sell some of the furniture to raise money to help restore the estate, which they hope to open to the public. Plus, Brown and his wife are moving in and faced a problem - there was just too much furniture.

      Day was highly regarded, making furniture for senators, congressmen, UNC Chapel Hill, and even the governor's mansion, said Jack Williams, a member of the board of directors at the Thomas Day House and Union Tavern in Milton. "He made all the pews in the Presbyterian church here with the understanding that his family could sit downstairs with the rest of the people, rather than up in the balcony with the slaves," Williams said.

      But Day also had to walk a fine line, especially because he owned more property and land than some white men in the area, said Michael Ausbon, decorative art associate curator at the N.C. Museum of History. He even owned slaves, though historians are unsure whether that was for labor or to find ways to help them. "He was very successful at balancing that tightrope of surviving as a free person of color in a white-dominated antebellum society," Ausbon said.

      Jason McCoon, owner of Tory Hill, said this is the first time Day's work has come through his auction house. But Day's furniture has only become well-known in the last decade, he said. "His work has finally been recognized as not only prolific but really high quality and really nice," McCoon said.

      That recognition included a three-year exhibit at the N.C. Museum of History that encompassed Day's life, business, and furniture. Pieces from the exhibit have been moved to the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C., but Day can still be seen at the North Carolina museum - his statue is on the steps outside.

      Even after living at Rose Hill as a child, Brown still marvels at the history of the estate and the furniture. "These places were made to host parties," he said. "It's amazing to sit and think back about people that were U.S. senators and possibly even presidents, and other congressmen, sitting around, drinking beers, eating there and talking. "People say, 'If the walls could talk ... .' In this case, it's, 'If the furniture could talk, the things they could say."

      Source: Raleigh News & Observer, June 2013. Seligson: 919-829-8983.
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      North Carolina Senate 1858

      "Hon. Bedford Brown introduced a bill to incorporate the Milton, Yanceyville & Junction Railroad Company, which was read 1st time and referred to the committee on Internal Improvements and ordered to be printed. This company proposes to construct a railroad from Greensboro, N.C., via Milton and Yanceyville, to connect with the Danville, Va., Railroad."

      The Charlotte Democrat (Charlotte, North Carolina), 30 November 1858.
      _______________

      Quinton Anderson (1783-1854)

      Quinton Anderson (1783-1854)

      (for larger image, click on photograph)
      _______________

      See: The Heritage of Caswell County, North Carolina, Jeannine D. Whitlow, Editor (1985) at 90 (Article No. 18, "Some Grandchildren of John Anderson" by James E. & Sallie P. Anderson).
      _______________

      May 15, 1927 (Possibly The Caswell Messenger). The Old Home Place of the Anderson's Burned: Was occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Otis Reagan and Family. Fire Occurred Sunday Morning.

      A fire, which occurred last Sunday morning during the preaching hour, completely destroyed the old Anderson home, owned by George A. Anderson and located in Anderson Township, together with all the household effects and personal belongings of Otis Reagan and family who have been living at the Anderson place. Both from the financial and sentimental standpoints the fire caused a great loss. The house itself was partially covered by insurance. But the insurance coverage will not begin to replace the large, old 12-room building. It has not been learned whether or not Mr. Reagan had any insurance on his household goods. But it is certain that his loss is great, in which he has the sympathy of many friends. But the destruction of this famous old southern home, built by Quinton Anderson in 1820, and kept in the Anderson family for three generations is irreparable when the sentiment, traditions and historical associations that have gathered about the place are considered.

      It is said that Quinton Anderson was a prominent politician and that many distinguished men have been entertained within its portals. So it can be confidently asserted that what is commonly known as history was made about its blazing hearths and around its hospitable table. No amount of money and effort of the skilled artisan or artist can restore such a structure, rich in historic traditions, any more than the old table, benches and flagons used at the "Cheshire Cheese" by Dr Johnson and his contemporaries could be reproduced be modern mechanism and art.

      Aside from this the old house had been HOME to three or four generations. This fact has hallowed the house and the memory of it, to every one who has warmed himself and herself by its fire places, slept in its beds, played about its doors, eaten at its table, looked out on the landscapes from its windows and sat on its porches on summer nights beneath the star-domed canopy, looking to heaven, dreaming of the ages, past, present and to come. In this home the youngsters were cuddled in the arms of the mother who rocked them to sleep as she sang the old plantation melodies or crooned to them the eternal songs of mother love. The problems of all homes were entertained and settled there as the growing children trooped in and out of its open doors. The old fashioned parlor was the scene of many a courtship. Matches were made and unmade there. Gala days filled with high spirited romance {and} adventure come both ceremoniously and un-ceremoniously, to that home. Mother(s) hearts were torn in that sacred place called home, and mothers heads were bowed in agonizing grief when the fledglings of the house spread their wings and flitted from the old home and left father and mother to sit with empty hands about a lonely hearth. And it was from the front door of the old home place that the still forms of the sacred dead were borne by sympathizing neighbors and placed tenderly under the cedars in gods acre.

      It is true that a fire cannot destroy all the hallowed association and memories of a home. But the house about which they have clustered comes in time, to be a sacred place. And the disappearance of such an ancient edifice is sometimes next akin to tragedy to those who for several generations have known it as home.
      _______________

      Quinton Anderson was the first U.S. Postmaster at Anderson's Store, Caswell County, North Carolina, which operated from 1 April 1815 until 29 April 1892, when it became known as Anderson Post Office. Source: Caswell County, North Carolina Post Offices.
      _______________

      It appears that Anderson's Store was demolished around 1920. However, it obviously was a focal point for the community, being the post office, and a polling (voting) site. Other postmasters were Miss Mary A. McNutt and George Anderson. The stage from Milton to Greensboro probably stopped there. In 1984, M. Q. Plumblee wrote: "Anderson's Store was one of the early ones built in Anderson township. It was located across the road from the Quinton Anderson residence. The west end of the present James W. Tate's residence is located over a part of the old store site."

      Source: From Rabbit Shuffle to Collins Hill: Stories of Southern Caswell County, North Carolina, Millard Quentin Plumblee (1984) at 20.
      _______________

      July 4th Company Muster, Celebration, and Vote: 1828

      "At a company muster, and celebration on the fourth of July, at the store of Quinton Anderson, esq. in Caswell County, where between 250 and 300 of the citizens were assembled, and after the company was addressed at some length by Barzillai Graves [probably General Barzillai Graves], in favor of the Administration [of President John Quincy Adams], and Bedford Brown, in favor of General Andrew Jackson, the vote on the presidential election was taken when the whole of the company declared themselves in favor of General Jackson with the exception of three."

      The Hillsborough Recorder (Hillsborough, NC), 9 July 1828.

      This most likely was a straw vote (an unofficial ballot conducted as a test of opinion) and in no way binding.

      The 1828 United States presidential election was the 11th quadrennial presidential election. It was held from Friday, October 31 to Tuesday, December 2, 1828. It featured a repetition of the 1824 election, as President John Quincy Adams of the National Republican Party faced Andrew Jackson of the Democratic Party. Source: Wikipedia [accessed 7 December 2022]

      Quinton Anderson (1783-1854) operated a store in what now is Anderson Township
      General Azariah Graves (1768-1850)
      Bedford Brown (1795-1870)
      _______________

      The death of NC State Senator Bartlett Yancey precipitated the following:

      Legislature of N. Carolina: Senate, Monday, Nov. 17 [1828]

      "On motion of Mr. Miller, ordered that a writ of election issue to the Sheriff of Caswell County, directing him to hold an election in that county on the 24 instant [November], for the election of a Senator to supply the vacancy occasioned by the death of Bartlett Yancy, Esq."*

      The North-Carolina Star (Raleigh, NC), 20 November 1828.

      Bedford Brown (1795-1870) was elected to serve the remainder of Bartlett Yancey's term. The next year, 1829, Brown resigned to accept appointment to the US Senate to fill the seat of Senator John Branch, Jr., who had joined the Andrew Jackson administration as Secretary of the Navy. Brown was succeeded by James Rainey. In 1828, George Williamson was Caswell County Sheriff.
      __________

      Bartlett Yancey was succeeded as Speaker of the NC Senate by Jesse Speight of Greene County.
      __________

      *Yancy was a common spelling of the surname.
      _______________

      North Carolina Senate: Friday, November 28, 1828

      "Bedford Brown, the Senator elect from Caswell County vice Bartlett Yancey, deceased, qualified and took his seat."

      Newbern Spectator (Newbern, NC), 6 December 1828.
      _____

      "vice" = Latin, meaning "in place of."
      _______________

      "Yesterday a writ was ordered to be issued for holding an election in Caswell County, on Friday the 18th instant [December], for the choice of a Senator to supply the vacancy occasioned by the appointment of Mr. [Bedford] Brown to the Senate of the United States."

      The Weekly Gleaner (Salem, NC), 22 December 1829.
      _______________

      State Legislature: In Senate, 9 December 1829

      On motion of Mr. Martin, ordered that a writ of election issue to the Sheriff of Caswell County, directing him to hold an election on the 18th inst. [December] to fill the vacancy occasioned by the election of Bedford Brown as United States Senator.

      The Raleigh Register (Raleigh, NC), 14 December 1829.
      _______________

      Civil War and Bedford Brown

      Caswell County's Bedford Brown (1795-1870) represented the county and state in several elected positions. As the Civil War approached he was in the North Carolina Senate.

      Below is a resolution he presented to the NC Senate in 1860 with respect to the views of some Caswell County residents (described as "the best men and purest patriots of Caswell").

      Bedford Brown is an interesting southern politician. He fought until the very end to preserve the union and North Carolina's participation therein.
      However, after a North Carolina convention voted to secede, Bedford Brown followed the wishes of his constituents. But, until his death he believed the destruction of the union was a mistake.

      Weekly State Journal (Raleigh, NC), 26 Dec 1860.
      _______________

      In December 1860, before the North Carolina Senate, Caswell County's Bedford Brown stated the following:

      "Suppose we dissolve the Union and set up a Southern Confederacy, how long would it last? Are not the very elements of destrction in our own borders?

      The Semi-Weekly State Journal (Raleigh, NC), 12 December 1860.
      _______________

      1850 United States Federal Census
      Name: Quinton Anderson
      Age: 66
      Birth Year: abt 1784
      Birthplace: Caswell
      Home in 1850: Caswell, North Carolina, USA
      Gender: Male
      Family Number: 1129
      Household Members
      Name Age
      Quinton Anderson 66
      Melissa W Anderson 38
      John L Anderson 30
      _______________

      1860 US Census
      Name: Bedford Brown
      Age in 1860: 64
      Birth Year: abt 1796
      Birthplace: North Carolina
      Home in 1860: Not Stated, Caswell, North Carolina
      Gender: Male
      Post Office: Locust Hill
      Household Members: Name Age
      Bedford Brown 64
      Mary L Brown 62
      L Brown 40 [Livingston Brown, lawyer]

      In Federal Census for Caswell County, 1860, page 615 [pencilled number]:
      Household 17
      Brown, Bedford 64 M W Farmer 20,000 44,550(?)
      Mary L. 62 F W
      L. [Livingston] 40 M W Lawyer

      In Federal Census for Caswell County, 1870, page
      Household 20
      Brown, Bedford 75 M W Farmer 10,000 400 North Carolina
      Livingston 50 M W Lawyer
      [no other family listed]

      Note: The next five households list 22 Colored residents, all named Brown.

      1870 United States Federal Census
      Name: Bedford Brown
      Estimated Birth Year: abt 1795
      Age in 1870: 75
      Birthplace: North Carolina
      Home in 1870: Locust Hill, Caswell, North Carolina
      Race: White
      Gender: Male
      Value of real estate: 10,000
      Post Office: Locust Hill
      Household Members: Name Age
      Bedford Brown 75
      Livingston Brown 50

  • Sources 
    1. Details: "The Original Bloomsburg-1797" (Article in The Record-Advertiser, 15 June 1972, by Kenneth H. Cook).

    2. Details: Cyclopedia of Eminent and Representative Men of the Carolinas of the Nineteenth Century: With a Brief Historical Introduction on South Carolina, Edward McCrady, Samuel A'Court Asher (1892) at 561-562.

    3. Details: Jones, Houston G. Bedford Brown: State Rights Unionist. Carrollton, Georgia: West Georgia College, 1955.

    4. Details: Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1981) at 10.

    5. Details: Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1981) at 9.