Caswell County Genealogy
 

Bigelow, Thomas Pattillo

Male 1802 - 1873  (71 years)


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  • Name Bigelow, Thomas Pattillo  [1
    Born 1802  [1
    Gender Male 
    Name Tom 
    Reference Number 30207 
    Died 25 Sep 1873  Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried Bigelow Family Cemetery, Fitch, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I29599  Caswell County
    Last Modified 25 Nov 2022 

    Mother Moseley, Elizabeth,   b. 1762, Goochland County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 19 Jan 1820  (Age > 58 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F52203  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Brighton, Elizabeth,   b. May 1825, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 May 1909, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 84 years) 
    Reference Number 421964 
    Children 
     1. Living
    +2. Bigelow, George,   b. Abt 1840, Anderson Township, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Nov 1928  (Age ~ 88 years)  [natural]
    +3. Bigelow, William,   b. Abt 1844, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Apr 1919, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 75 years)  [natural]
    +4. Bigelow, Cora Virginia,   b. Abt 1848, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    +5. Bigelow, Albert,   b. Aug 1848, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jun 1922, Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 73 years)  [natural]
    +6. Bigelow, John Henry,   b. Oct 1849, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Oct 1921  (Age ~ 72 years)  [natural]
    +7. Bigelow, Lewis,   b. Apr 1850, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Sep 1927  (Age ~ 77 years)  [natural]
    +8. Bigelow, Zachariah,   b. 1858, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     9. Bigelow, Sicily,   b. Abt 1860, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    +10. Bigelow, Laura,   b. Abt 1862, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Oct 1950, Alamance County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 88 years)  [natural]
    +11. Bigelow, Mary Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1862, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    +12. Bigelow, Saluda,   b. Jun 1862, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Oct 1950, Ringgold, Pittsylvania County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 88 years)  [natural]
     13. Bigelow, Nancy,   b. Abt 1866, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    +14. Bigelow, James Thomas,   b. 22 Mar 1868, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Feb 1947, Flandreau, Moody County, South Dakota Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)  [natural]
     15. Bigelow, Fannie,   b. Abt 1869, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 25 Nov 2022 
    Family ID F6064  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsDied - 25 Sep 1873 - Caswell County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
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  • Notes 
    • Thomas Pattillo Bigelow (1802-1873)

      Bigelow Potato_The_Weekly_Standard_Wed__Jan_16__1856_

      (for larger image, click on photograph)
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      "Bigelow Potato," The Weekly Standard, Wednesday, 16 January 1856.
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      Caswell County History

      In 1860 Caswell County had more enslaved people than "whites." Total enslaved: 9,355.

      Two enslavers "owned" 100-199 enslaved people. The names of these enslavers are not known.

      However, sixteen in Caswell County enslaved 50-69 people. One enslaver was white lawyer and farmer Thomas Pattillo Bigelow (1802-1873), whose surname is shared by a large Caswell County group. Bigelow had several children with one of his enslaved females, Betsy.

      Powell, William S. "When the Past Refused to Die: A History of North Carolina 1777-1977." Durham (North Carolina): Moore Publishing Company, 1977, pp. 518-519.
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      Thomas Pattillo Bigelow was the son of Unknown Pattillo and Elizabeth Unknown Pattillo. Elizabeth Unknown Pattillo apparently had at least three children with Unknown Pattillo: Thomas Pattillo; Mary Pattillo; and Elizabeth Pattillo. It appears that all three children assumed the surname of their stepfather Roderick Bigelow when Elizabeth Unknown Pattillo married Roderick Bigelow. Thus, for purposes of this database the children will be shown as, for example, Thomas Pattillo Bigelow. While not genealogically correct, it makes the ancestral outline easier to follow.

      Based upon the will of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow (set forth below) and census records, it seems likely that his children were: (1) William Bigelow; (2) John Henry Bigelow; (3) Albert Bigelow; (4) Cora Virginia Bigelow; (5) Saluda Bigelow; (6) Mary E. Bigelow; (7) Laura Bigelow; (8) Nancy Bigelow; (9) James Bigelow; (10) Lewis Bigelow; (11) George Bigelow; (12) Elizabeth Bigelow; (13) Sicily Bigelow; and (14) Zachariah Bigelow.

      Some (possibly all) of these children were by Betsy Bigelow, a former slave of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow (see his will below). Some claim, but without any supporting documentation, that Betsy Bigelow was of Native American ancestry (Cherokee or Saponi).

      In a letter dated 28 December 1849, Albert Atkinson Pattillo addressed Thomas Pattillo Bigelow as "Uncle." This would imply that a brother of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow was the father of Albert Atkinson Pattillo. Sisters are ruled out because they would not have passed on the Pattillo surname. As the father of Albert Atkinson Pattillo was Zachariah Pattillo (c.1893-1825), it is reasonable to consider that Thomas Pattillo Bigelow and Zachariah Pattillo were brothers. This would make Augustine Pattillo (c.1746-1794) and Elizabeth Moseley Pattillo the parents of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow. Note, however, that this ancestry has not been confirmed and is placed here only as a hypothesis for researchers to use. How does Elizabeth Unknown Pattillo (who subsequently married Roderick Bigelow) fit into this scenario? For the above to work, this Elizabeth must have been the wife of Zachariah Pattillo at some point. Did Augustine Pattillo, who died in 1794, leave the widow Elizabeth Moseley Pattillo who married Roderick Bigelow?

      Note that the will of Roderick Bigelow makes reference to "her three last children" when describing the three known children that Elizabeth Pattillo had with her first husband. Thus, Thomas Pattillo Bigelow probably had siblings in addition to Mary and Elizabeth.

      From many Caswell County documents it appears that Thomas Pattillo Bigelow was the uncle of Anderson Henry Willis Pattillo (1848-1878). This would be not consistent with the above theory because the father of Anderson Henry Willis Pattillo was Zachariah Augustus Pattillo, himself the son of Zachariah Pattillo and Mary L. Jordan Pattillo. Thus, it does not seem possible for Thomas Pattillo Bigelow to be the uncle of both Albert Atkinson Pattillo and Anderson Henry Willis Pattillo. However, if Thomas Pattillo Bigelow was indeed the uncle of Anderson Henry Willis Pattillo, that relationship would suggest that Thomas Pattillo Bigelow and Zachariah Augustus Pattillo (father of Anderson Henry Willis Pattillo) are brothers. In this scenario, the parents of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow would be Zachariah Pattillo and Mary L. Jordan Pattillo. However, where is an Elizabeth?

      Note that additional research indicates that Albert Atkinson Pattillo and Zachariah Augustus Pattillo are brothers and sons of Zachariah Pattillo, brother of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow. Anderson Henry Willis Pattillo is a son of Zachariah Augustus Pattillo, thus being a nephew of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow. Thus, the documents showing Thomas Pattillo Bigelow as the uncle of Anderson Henry Willis Pattillo appear either incorrect or incorrectly interpreted.

      Noted Caswell County, North Carolina, historian and Pattillo family researcher offered the following when discussing a power of attorney given to Thomas Pattillo Bigelow 21 March 1848 by Thomas Moody Kimbell [or Kimbrell], husband of Ann Elizabeth Pattillo:

      "This writer has examined the records of Caswell County, N.C. and has found no evidence that the power of attorney granted by Thomas M. Kimbell to Thomas Bigelow was ever recorded. It may be noted that Thomas Bigelow was a close relative and friend of the Pattillo family of Caswell County, N.C. Probably Mary L. Pattillo continued to cultivate the land owned by her daughter."

      Source:: At the Foot of the Lake: The Pattillo-Patillo Family and Allied Lines, Millard Quentin Plumblee (1987) at 67-68.
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      A sister of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow was Mary Pattillo Turner Carthel, and her children apparently are: Thomas Turner; James Turner; John Turner; and Thadeius Turner. See her entry in this database for more on the confusion over her name.
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      According to a Bigelow family member, James Weldon Bigelow related that John Henry Bigelow was invited to a white man's house for dinner and cigar. Not long afterwards someone told the man that "John Henry Bigelow wasn't white." The man said to his friend, "he fooled me." The man replied, "no, you fooled yourself. Then the man said, "if he married your daughter, their kids would look just like you."

      John Henry Bigelow purportedly also told James Weldon Bigelow that Thomas Pattillo Bigelow told his children, "if anybody messes with you, knock the hell out of them." John Henry Bigelow said that Thomas Pattillo Bigelow was fair with his slaves and let them roam at night. One night, a slave was visiting on another plantation with a young lady in a cabin. When the owners caught him, they chased him and they fell in a ditch. The slave ran back to Thomas Pattillo Bigelow's plantation. The next day, the neighboring plantation owner came to Thomas Pattillo Bigelow and asked for the slave to flog. Thomas Pattillo Bigelow said, "Neither animal nor human will be flogged on my land. If you had caught him on your land, there would be nothing I could do, but he's on my land now and I won't stand for it."
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      20th Day of September 1873
      H.F. Brandon, Probate Judge, Caswell County, NC
      Will Proved - Thomas Bigelow

      In the name of God, Amen, I Thomas Bigelow of the County of Caswell and state of North Carolina being of sound mind do make this my last Will and Testament. That after death I desire that my body be immediately interned. Second, that all of my just debts be paid.

      Item 1 - I give & bequeath to William Bigelow the track of land on which he now lives containing fifty or sixty acres and which has never been surveyed. The line to begin at or near Williams Stables and running in a Southwestern direction along a road to the land of Mrs. Smith compromising all the land on the West side of that road, also I give William Bigelow our Bay Mare named Mary.

      Item 2 - I give & bequest to John Henry Bigelow the track of land known as the Page track containing ninety or one hundred acres adjoining the land of Barzillai Graves, John B Stanfield and others, said land was purchased of Thomas D. Johnston.

      Item 3 - I give & bequeath to Albert Bigelow the track of land on which Clem Williamson now lives and where Cheesman Bigelow formerly lived containing 90 or one hundred acres it being two tracks of land bought of Goodwin Evans, Henry F. Adkins, reference may be made to the deeds and said Albert Bigelow shall be entitled to all the land the deeds call for.

      Item 4 - I give & bequeath to Cora Virginia Bigelow one thousand dollars in Bank Stock in the National Bank at Raleigh, N.C.

      Item 5 - I give & bequeath to Saluda Bigelow one thousand dollars in Bank Stock in the National at Raleigh, N.C.

      Item 6 - I give & bequeath to Mary Bigelow one thousand dollars in Bank Stock in the National Bank at Raleigh, N.C.

      Item 7 - I give & bequeath to Laura Bigelow one thousand dollars in Bank stock in the national Bank at Raleigh, N.C.

      Item 8 - I give & bequeath to Nancy Bigelow, six hundred dollars in Bank Stock in the National Bank at Raleigh, N.C., also four hundred dollars in money to be paid out of my Estate not given away.

      Item 9 - I give & bequeath to James Bigelow a life Policy taken out by me 11th day of Nov 1867 for five thousand dollars in the North American Insurance Company, New York and Countersigned 14th Nov 1867 registered No of said Policy 2487 and Policy No 12925.

      Item 10 - I give & bequeath to Zackariah Bigelow one thousand dollars in money to be invested by my Executor in Bank or other stock such as the Executor may think best for the use and benefit of said Zachariah Bigelow until the said Zachariah Bigelow arrives at the age of twenty one years.

      Item 11 - I give & bequeath to my Sister Mary Catherell [Carthel] formerly Mary Turner, Four hundred dollars also to Thomas Turner of the State of Texas and a Nephew of mine, Four hundred dollars, also to James Turner and John Turner and Thadeius Turner of the State of Texas, nephews of Mine, Four hundred dollars each, also to Lucreitia Collins of the State of Texas, a niece of mine, Four hundred dollars also to Anderson W. Pattillo of Caswell County, three hundred dollars.

      I direct my Executor to pay the legacies mentioned in this Item to the amount of $2,700 to be paid out of monies due me from Daniel Pierson for a tract of land sold Pierson should this debt be collected of Pierson in my life time, then in that case my Executor shall pay the legacies in this item moneys of my Estate not given away however if four any cause the debt due from Pierson on the lands which he bargained for fails to pay the legacies due in this item I direct that no other monies of my Estate shall go to pay this legacies. I think that debt sufficient to pay these legacies and leave a balance.

      Item 12 - I give & bequeath to Mary Bigelow our Piano.

      Item 13 - I give and bequeath to Betsy Bigelow who was once my slave and has attended to me in sickness and who has treated me kindly and nursed me in my old age the balance of my personal property consisting of Horses, cattle, hogs, household and kitchen furniture also farming utensils, crops of every kind, also all debts, moneys, effects of every kind not heretofore given away.

      I give and bequeath to Betsy Bigelow the same person named in Item 13 the balance of my Real estate not given off in this will including the Mansion and it surroundings also if from any cause the lands bought of the heirs of Thomas Covington died should fall to my Estate then and in that case, I give the same to Betsy Bigelow, with the same restrictions that I make in regard to my other real estate given her this will. I mean all other Real estate given Betsy Bigelow she shall have during her lifetime and then to be equally divided between Betsy Bigelows children named in this will.

      I appoint my friend, Brice Harralson my Executor and my wish is that he shall not be required to give security as Executor nor is he required to make an Inventory to count of my Estate, my desire is that he shall act for the minor children in collecting the dividends due them also the Policy due them and that no Guardian be appointed for them. The Executor shall use the money for their benefit in the education & other purposes which he may deem fit.

      The Executor shall not be required to pay interest on any money collected for the minor children and when they arrive at 21 years of age, the Executor will settle with them and take their receipts.

      Made 24th day of January 1873.

      In presence of Witness:
      F. A. Wiley
      James T. Oliver
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      The F. A. Wiley who witnessed the will of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow probably was Franklin A. Wiley (c.1825-1888):

      Franklin A. Wiley was Sheriff of Caswell County, North Carolina, from July 1850 (date first elected) until he resigned 1 April 1856. In 1871, when Senator John W. Stephens was murdered by the Ku Klux Klan in the Caswell County Courthouse in Yanceyville, North Carolina, Wiley was an ex-sheriff and, according to the confession of Klan leader John G. Lea, a member of the Caswell County Ku Klux Klan and part of the conspiracy to murder Senator John W. Stephens. It was Wiley who lured Stephens from the courtroom to the office in which the murder took place.

      Bigelow family lore tells that Thomas Pattillo Bigelow went into Yanceyville every day. However, on the day that Senator John W. Stephens was murdered, Thomas Pattillo Bigelow elected to remain at his home south of Yanceyville. Some have speculated that he knew of the Ku Klux Klan plan to murder Stephens and did not want to be associated in any way with the event. This, of course, is only speculation.

      At a meeting of the Democratic Party held in Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina, on 3 January 1860, Thomas Bigelow was selected as a delegate to a District Convention to consider whether North Carolina should secede from the Union. The District Convention apparently was to be held in Graham, Alamance County, North Carolina on 6 March 1860. The more specific purpose of the District Convention was "to appoint two delegates for this congressional district to said convention at Charleston, and two alternates to act in their stead if said delegates cannot attend, and also to nominate a candidate for elector for President and Vice-President." The Charleston "national" convention of the Democratic party was to be held 23 April 1860. Thus, Thomas Bigelow was selected to attend a local convention that would select delegates to attend the national convention in Charleston, South Carolina. Other delegates were chosen to attend a North Carolina state convention. Source: The North Carolina Standard, Wednesday, 18 January 1860.
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      Caswell County October Court 1842
      Deed Book ), Page 429

      Bond of John K. Brooks as Sheriff of Caswell County. Bonded by Thomas W. Graves, Thomas Bigelow, A. Willis, Lancelot Johnston, Alexis Howard, Samuel Moore, James Kerr, and James K. Lea. Source: Caswell County North Carolina Will Books 1777-1814 and 1814-1843, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1983), Volume II at 158.
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      In 1903 Albert Yancey Kerr purchased the local newspaper renaming it Caswell County Democrat. He wrote an editorial May 4, 1905, in which he pretended to have been at the Courthouse when it was built. "The faces of many prominent men in and around Yanceyville loomed up before my vision. Among them were (a long list of names which included) A. A. Pattillo, Thomas Bigelow." And, Thomas Bigelow was the bondsman/witness for the marriage of Albert A. Pattillo and Elizabeth Ann Dodson May 21 1838 and for Lewis A. Pattillo and Lucinda Boswell Jan 22 1839.
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      Caswell County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions
      April 1843
      "Elijah Graves, foreman grand jury. Among jurors: Owen McAleer, Abner Stanfield, Samuel Hinton, Thomas Bigelow, James Mebane, Hosea McNeill, Daniel W. Swan, Ransom Boswell, Devereux Hightower, Geo. W. Johnston."
      Source: Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976) at 67.

      Caswell County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions (April 1847):

      "Following to take taxable lists: Richmond Dist., Abisha Slade, Jas. McCain, and William Long; Caswell Dist., Wm. W. Price, John Keesee, and Richard Jones; Gloucester District., Thomas W. Graves, Francis Day, and Thomas Bigelow; St. David's Dist., Joseph Simpson, Christy Turner, and Alexander Moore."
      Source: Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976) at 72.

      Will Book 1843-1868 Will book Q, page 5680 dated 1851 states that Governor
      of North Carolina David Reid appointed Thomas Bigelow a justice of the peace.

      Caswell County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions
      October 1856
      "Thomas Bigelow to administer estate of William Hooper."
      Source: Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976) at 84.

      Caswell County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions
      January 1858
      "Thos. Bigelow, Thos. D. Johnston, and Nath. M. Roan to contract for repairs to bridge over Country Line near Gen. Jas. K. Lea's factory."
      Source: Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976) at 86.

      Caswell County Board of Commissioners (September 7, 1869):

      "Petition filed by W. N. Kimbro and M. Oliver for Jury to lay off road beginning opposite the Tobacco Factory, formerly James K. Leas, running across Country Line Creek at the bridge and by Thomas Bigelow's, and W. N. Kimbro's to the township line above and south of Kimbro's school house."
      Source: Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976) at 106.

      Caswell County Board of Commissioners (April 4, 1870):

      "Felix Roan released as overseer of road from Bigelow's bridge to a point near Red Fork, and Green Robertson appointed in his place. Dr. N. M. Roan be relieved as overseer of road from Bigelow's bridge to the Milton and Yanceyville Road near the Male Academy and that Marstain Swann be appointed in his place."
      Source: Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976) at 108.

      Caswell County Board of Commissioners (June 5, 1871):

      "Thomas J. Womack granted privilege to erect one gate across public highway near Genl. Lea's old factory. Also Thos. D. Johnston and Thomas Bigelow to erect one gate over public highway near plantations of Thomas Bigelow and Dr. N. M. Roan."
      Source: Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976) at 111.

      ". . . In 1871 a new bank was chartered, the Bank of Caswell, under the direction of commissioners John B. Blackwell, George Williamson, James Poteat, Thomas D. Johnston, and Thomas Bigelow." Source: When the Past Refused to Die: A History of Caswell County North Carolina 1777-1977, William S. Powell (1977) at 345.

      Caswell County Board of Commissioners (January 6, 1873):

      "Nathaniel Hooper to oversee road from fork near Iverson Oliver's to township line with hands of A. J. Kimbro, W. W. Kimbro, T. J. Willis, M. Oliver, Bigelow's hands at Enoch's place."
      Source: Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976) at 114.

      Wyatt Walker who gave his occupation as "coachmaker" in the 1850 US Federal Census (Caswell County, North Carolina) was a resident of Yanceyville and a storekeeper as well as coachmaker. His age was thirty-nine and place of birth was Rockingham County. His wife was Pamela Unknown and there were seven children. It is believed that he left Yanceyville after the Civil War. His account book was found in the old Samuel P. Hill law office by A. Yancey Kerr who purchased the law office in 1906. Mr. Walker possibly left the book with attorney hill in hopes of collecting accounts. The following persons are listed in the account book as having procured goods or coach services from Mr. Walker between the years of 1854-56: (compiled by George Yancey Kerr.)[partial list]:

      Thomas Bigelow
      A. A. Pattillo

      Source: Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976) at 136.

      One researcher had the following observation: "Thomas Pattillo Bigelow was a note shaver. He lent money to people on their slaves and often ended up with the money and the slaves."
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      Branson's North Carolina Business Directory for 1872 listed Thomas Bigelow as among the most outstanding farmers in Caswell County, owning 1150 acres, valued at $4.50 per acre. See: When the Past Refused to Die: A History of Caswell County North Carolina 1777-1977, William S. Powell (1977) at 268.
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      The following is from When the Past Refused to Die: A History of Caswell County North Carolina 1777-1977, William S. Powell (1977) at 476:

      "The Farmer's Journal, closely associated with the State Agricultural Society, published a paper in its April, 1854, number that had been read before the Caswell County Agricultural Society. In the paper, prepared by a committee composed of John A. Graves, N. M. Roan, E. P. Jones, Thos. D. Johnston, Thos. Bigalow, and S. P. Hill, a comparison was made between agricultural conditions in Caswell County and those in Columbia County, Pennsylvania. The superiority of the Pennsylvania county in value of land, value of farm equipment, and in other areas, was credited to the good work of an agricultural society. A clear call was made for scientific study and improvement at home. Reading the Farmer's Journal was recommended to planters and farmers in Caswell and E. C. (probably E. P.) and Y. Jones, A. Willis, and William Long were agents to receive subscriptions."
      _______________

      The exact death date of 25 September 1873 comes from a complaint filed 19 April 1876 by Thomas C. Thaxton against the estate of Thomas Pattillo Bigelow seeking repayment of $1400 allegedly advanced by Thaxton to Bigelow in connection with a tobacco manufacturing venture.
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      Thomas Pattillo Bigelow was appointed co-administrator of the will of Thomas Vaughan in 1835 after the son of Thomas Vaughan, Richard Vaughan, refused to qualify.
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      Caswell County, North Carolina
      Deed Book W, Pages 222-223

      Hiram Parks to Thomas Bigelow both of Caswell County, for $28.35, 8.1 acres adjacent John Loyd, Joseph McCulloch, on Ervine Road and great road. 28 January 1824. Witness: Zachariah Pattillo.
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      Caswell County, North Carolina
      Deed Book AA
      Page 69-70: Alfred Parks to Thomas Bigelow both of Caswell County, for $210, 140 acres on Country Line Creek adjacent Hiram Parks, Dameron, on Pinson's Road. 31 December 1828. Witnesses: William Florence, C. W. Brooks. Proved by oath Christopher Brooks.
      Source: Caswell County North Carolina Deed Books 1817-1840 Abstracts, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1992) at 179.
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      The letter transcribed below was addressed to: Thos Bigelow Esq. Yanceyville Caswell N. C.
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      Wilks County, GA Dec 28th 1849
      Uncle Thos [Thomas Pattillo Bigelow]

      Dear Sir:

      I am operating in the same region of country where I sold last spring. The country is full of negros, however not so many in this immediate neighborhood. All those I sold here have turned out well, except Lucinda Ginnie. Her owner has traded her off at considerable sacrifice. The people here say they believe in me, & I am fixing to sell them negros at high prices. Sold a girl this morning 12 years well grown & likely 675$. Cost 405$. I have been offered 850$ for Matthew 18 years, weighs 155 lbs, am asking 950$, expect to get 900$. Have been offered for boy 9 years weighs 60 lbs 400$ cash 200$. Such boys are bringing from 400$ 500$. Here have been offered 800$ for woman & boy which cost 450$ -- all the offers I have had. Negros are in demand & are selling well. Good young men are selling from 850$ to 1000$. Good grown girls 650$ - 750$ according to appearance. I saw a trader yesterday who sold 2 girls at 750$ each & says not so likely as mine. Good plough boys weighing 80 lbs are selling from 650 to 725$. &C &C

      Robin King's son is in Washington with 6 or 8 negros. I have not seen him yet to hear how he is doing. I at camp 6 miles from town -- at my old stand.

      The old Gentleman who bought Calvin says he would not take 1000$ for him & is negotiating with me for 5 others. I shall sell for 1600$ over first cost if no accident happens. I hope to be at home by the middle of February. I will remit you some money in a few days & then write to you more fully. &C

      Boys & young men are more in demand just here than any other kind. You are not apprised of the fact that the law relative to the slave trade in this state has been repealed. My friends say I escaped narrowly last spring. &c &c I wrote to my wife yesterday -- please let her know you received news from me for fear my letter may not reach her.

      All are well &C &C

      Very Respectfully
      A. A. Pattillo [Albert Atkinson Pattillo]

      PS Please say to Capt. James Poteat that I applied for his claim in Lawrenceville, [but] failed to get it [as a] consequence of the lawyer's absinse [absence] -- he is a member of S. C. Legislature. I will attend to it on my return if I should go that way.

      A.A.P.

      It is a mistaken notion that the crop of cotton in Georgia is short. It is unusually good here. I am informed better than last year. A gentleman told me yesterday his crop would bring him 10,000$ 200 bags &C.
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      1862-1863: Will Book S, Page 579

      Will of Richard Gwynn: Written 21 Sept 1862. Friend Thomas Bigelow loaned negroes for his life for him to control and receive benefits. At Bigelow"s death, slaves to be sold in families and to pick their masters if exec agrees. If sold, 1/5 proceeds to brother Hugh Gwynn for his life and remainder to heirs living at time of testator's death of Zera Gwynn, Daniel Gwynn, John Gwynn, and David Boyd. Servant Charlotte to have furniture. Remainder of estate sold and same divided as above. Exec to put tombstones up for Mother and Father and enclose graveyard with stone or iron railing. Part of estate for Augustus Gwynn held in trust and not to be used to pay his debts; same for that intended for Pinkney Gwynn. Exec: G. J. Farish, Rice Gwynn. Wit: A. Gunn, Bedford Brown.

      Sources: Caswell County North Carolina Will Books 1777-1814 and 1814-1843 (Two Volumes In One), Katharine Kerr Kendall (1979 and 1983);Caswell County North Carolina Will Books 1843-1868, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1986).
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      The State Against F. A. Wiley
      The Weekly Standard (Raleigh, North Carolina)
      31 August 1870 (Pages 1-2)

      Thomas Bigelow, being sworn before, stated that he lived in Caswell about 2½ miles from Yanceyville and was at the meeting in the evening and remained about half an hour; I arrived about 9 o'clock; saw Mr. Stephens at the meeting; I went out over to Harrelson's and Mckee's store; saw Mr. Wiley come out and had a short conversation with him; Mr. Brown was speaking, I knew by his voice; I saw Mr. Wiley three or four times after in passing; saw him at the pump watering his horse just before; I left a short time after; went up the street about 75 yards; talked to Hodnett; went back to store; saw Wiley and Wilkerson drinking bitters; Wiley stayed a short time. I think it was about 5 o'clock.

      I left town for home about an hour after; Geo. Bigelow went with me; he lives at my house; I saw Mr. Dismuke at _______ store; also saw Jerry Smith.

      No one was speaking when the call for Mr. Brown was made; I met Mr. Brown going forwards as I was coming out; I left Mr. Wiley in the room when I went out; have not been examined before; did not see Mr. Stephens or Mr. Wiley leave the meeting; that was between 4 and 5 o'clock; I think Mr. Hill spoke after Mr. Brown; I have no reason to believe that there is an organization in Caswell for the illegal punishment of white or colored persons for the violation of the State laws; Mr. Stephens made many enemies by harassing the people, but I do not believe there was a general bitter feeling against him throughout the County; Mr. Hodnett scored Mr. Stephens very heavy and bore down on him pretty severe, he said that Mr. Stephens got more money than he ought to.

      I talked with Mr. Wiley, he said he got in a difficulty with one of his hands, and the case was carried before Mr. Stephens, and that he fared much better than he expected; Mr. Stephens and Mr. Wiley was, as far as I know, on the best of terms, but differed in politics; I believe there was some 3 or 4 persons whipped, but do not believe there was any regular organized body for that purpose, but there was an understanding, to go and do the whipping; I do not know that they came from another County, but I heard at Prospect Hill that they came from Orange; their horses were disguised; do not know how many there were of them.

      Is it a matter of such little consequence as not to be recollected? I believe there were five cases of whipping and two murders. A colored man by the name of Jacobs was on the road-side watching for a chance to kill a Kuklux when he got killed himself. The Chief Justice stated that he would adjourn the Court until 3 o'clock, and owing to the noise in and around the Court-house it would meet in the Supreme Court room.
      _______________

      1850 United States Federal Census
      Name: Thos Begalon [Thos Bigelow]
      Age: 45
      Birth Year: abt 1805
      Birthplace: Warren
      Home in 1850: Caswell, North Carolina, USA
      Gender: Male
      Occupation: Farmer
      Value of Real Estate Owned: 5000 or 8000 [text is unclear]
      Family Number: 948
      Household Members:
      Name Age
      Thos Begalon [Bigelow] 45

      The 1860 US Federal Census (Yanceyville Township, Caswell County, North Carolina) shows him as the only member of his household, age fifty-five, farmer, born in North Carolina, with real property valued at $15,300 and personal property valued at $67,300 (presumably mostly slaves).

      The 1870 US Federal Census (Yanceyville Township, Caswell County, North Carolina) lists him as Thomas Bigelow, age 68, male, white, born in North Carolina, farmer with $8,500 in real estate, and $9,000 in personalty. While listed under a separate household number, he is shown adjacent to Elizabeth, and she is given the Bigelow surname. She is described as mulatto as are the following children (all born in North Carolina):

      Cora (22, seamstress)
      John (17, farm laborer)
      Zachariah (14, farm laborer)
      Sicily (10, at school) (possibly Saluda Bigelow)
      Laura (8, at school)
      James (6, at home)
      Nancy (4, at home)

      1870 United States Federal Census
      Name: Thomas Bigalow
      Birth Year: abt 1802
      Age in 1870: 68
      Birthplace: North Carolina
      Home in 1870: Yanceyville, Caswell, North Carolina
      Race: White
      Gender: Male
      Household Members: Name Age
      Thomas Bigalow 68
      _______________


  • Sources 
    1. Details: Patillo, Pattillo, Pattullo and Pittillo Families, Melba C. Crosse (1972) at 130.