Caswell County Genealogy
 

Frederick, Richmond Stanfield

Frederick, Richmond Stanfield

Male 1918 - 1983  (64 years)

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  • Name Frederick, Richmond Stanfield 
    Born 24 Nov 1918  Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Reference Number 17 
    Residence 1930  Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _MILT World War II Veteran 
    Died 29 Sep 1983  Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Highland Burial Park, Danville, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I17  Caswell County
    Last Modified 21 Jun 2022 

    Father Frederick, William Waters,   b. 5 Oct 1879, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jun 1931, Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Stanfield, Mary Stella,   b. 6 May 1881, Person County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Apr 1955, Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 9 Dec 1903  Residence of Minerva Catherine (Kate) Stanfield, Person County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Reference Number 2156 
    Family ID F18  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Moorefield, Sallie Womack,   b. 9 Oct 1921, Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 1971, Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years) 
    Married 9 Oct 1941  Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Reference Number 1822 
    Children 
    +1. Living
    +2. Living
    +3. Living
    Last Modified 21 Jun 2022 
    Family ID F5  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Puckett, Zena Lee,   b. 10 Feb 1922, Keeling, Pittsylvania County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Apr 2004, Danville, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Married 17 Jun 1972 
    Reference Number 2962 
    Last Modified 21 Jun 2022 
    Family ID F17  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 24 Nov 1918 - Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1930 - Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 9 Oct 1941 - Caswell County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 29 Sep 1983 - Yanceyville, Caswell County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Highland Burial Park, Danville, Virginia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick and His Mother
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Retirement
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick at Caswell Hardware
    Hospital Ship 'Wisteria'
    VFW/American Legion at Caswell County Fair
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick and Sally Womack Moorefield Frederick at 1957 Wedding of Barbara Jo Clayton
    Mary Stella Stanfield Frederick and Richmond Stanfield Frederick
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick at Camp Croft, SC
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick and Sally Moorefield Frederick Christmas Early 1950s
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Funeral Flag
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Funeral Bible
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Funeral Bible Dedication
    Roxboro Graded School, Grade 6B, 1930
    Kennedy General Hospital (Memphis, TN)
    Kennedy General Hospital Historical Marker
    Doris Hoeflich Moore, Hoyt Ray Moore, Richmond Stanfield Frederick, Zena Puckett Frederick
    Glenn L. Martin Plant Near Baltimore, MD
    Glenn L. Martin Plant Near Baltimore, MD 1939
    Christmas 1957 at Moorefield Homeplace

    Documents
    Richmond Standfield Frederick Obituary
    Richmond Standfield Frederick Obituary
    Stanfield Family Bible
    Stanfield Family Bible
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick and Sallie Womack Moorefield 1941 Marriage Record
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick and Sallie Womack Moorefield 1941 Marriage Record
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Purple Heart Award
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Purple Heart Award
    Moorefield-Frederick Marriage License 1941
    Moorefield-Frederick Marriage License 1941
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Roxboro Graded School 1923
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Roxboro Graded School 1923

    Headstones
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick and Zena Lee Puckett Frederick at Highland Burial Park
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick and Zena Lee Puckett Frederick at Highland Burial Park

    Newspapers
    Moorefield-Frederick Wedding 9 October 1941
    Pass-Clayton Nuptials
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Obituary
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Now In USA
    The SHOWBOAT Vol. 1, No 16, June 1946, Cover (Kennedy General Hospital)
    The SHOWBOAT Vol. 1, No. 2, 16 May 1945 (Kennedy General Hospital)
    Yanceyville Post Office 1954 The News and Observer (Raleigh, North Carolina) 8 March 1954
    Leonidas Pointer Frederick Funeral, Person County Times, 20 April 1939
    Clayton and Frederick Visit Beaches, Person County Times, 3 Aug 1939
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick Wounded, The Courier-Times, 22 Jan 1945
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick and Sallie Womack Moorefield Frederick Honored, The Courier-Times, 22 Jan 1945
    Sallie Womack Moorefield Weds Richmond Stanfield Frederick, Person County Times, 12 Oct 1941
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick: One Way to Learn, The Roxboro Courier, 8 Feb 1945
    Richmond Stanfield Frederick and William Ransome Frederick School Attendance The Roxboro Courier, 13 June 1928
    Willie W. Frederick Norfolk, VA, Visit

  • Notes 
    • Richmond Stanfield Frederick (1918-1983)

      Richmond Stanfield Frederick (1918-1983)Richmond and Sallie Frederick

      Richmond S. Frederick (1918-1983)36th Infantry Training Battalion (Camp Croft, SC)

      Camp Croft MapRichmond Frederick Now in USA

      Richmond Stanfield Frederick (1918-1983)Richmond Stanfield Frederick (1918-1983)

      Moorefield-Frederick Wedding 09 Oct 1941Richmond Stanfield Frederick (1918-1983)

      Roxboro Graded School 1930

      Doris Hoeflich Moore, Hoyt Ray Moore, Richmond Stanfield Frederick, Zena Puckett Frederick

      (for larger image, click on photograph)
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      Wedding Article: The News and Observer (Raleigh, North Carolina), 20 Oct 1941.

      Penultimate Photograph: Richmond Stanfield Frederick is top row, fourth from left (white shirt, beside teacher or very tall student).

      Last Photograph (left-to-right): Doris Hoeflich Moore, Hoyt Ray Moore, Richmond Stanfield Frederick, Zena Puckett Frederick
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      Frederick Family Bible: "Richmond Stanfield Frederick was born Nov the 24 1918"

      Kate Fox-Mary Stella Stanfield Family Bible Record Page

      (click on photograph for larger image)
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      Arthur William Moorefield (with glasses behind children)
      Deborah White Moorefield
      Richmond Stanfield (Ricky) Frederick, Jr.
      Mary Jane Moorefield
      Frank James Moorefield
      Sallie Womack Moorefield Frederick (with arms around Frank)
      Frances Mozelle White Moorefield
      Richmond Stanfield Frederick (tallest person in room)
      Back-of-Head Child: Probably Frank James Moorefield, Jr.

      Christmas "dinner" at the Moorefield Homeplace 1957
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      School in Roxboro

      Roxboro Graded School Honor Roll

      In 1923 Richmond Stanfield Frederick (1918-1983) was in the first grade at the Roxboro Graded School (Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina). His teacher was Mrs. Long. He made both the perfect attendance list and the honor roll. Source: The Roxboro Courier (Person County, NC), 10 May 1923.
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      Attendance Honor Roll Central Graded School: 1927

      The following named pupils have been neither absent nor tardy during the first month of school. Names are given by grades and teachers having the respective section in charge (Third Grade: Miss Maude L. Montague, Teacher):

      Geraldine Brooks, Lillie Carver, Elizabeth Clayton, Ruth Davidson, Elsie Hassan, Mary King, Hazel McKee, Inez Parham, Marie Spencer, Mary E. Strum, Vivian Stanfield, Zenith Wrenn, Constance Zaytoun, Buddy Allgood, Palma Barrett, A. Y. Clayton, Jr., John Day, Hezekiah Dixon, Bedford Jones, Joseph King, Howard Tolbert, Harold Tolbert, Bennie Wrenn, Alvah Young.

      Richmond Frederick, Fletcher Winstead, Anette Cushwa, Dot Clayton, Frances Critcher, Louise Featherston, Gladys Perkins, Caroline Michaels, Mary Miller.

      Source: The Roxboro Courier (Roxboro, North Carolina), November 2, 1927, p.2.

      Attendance Honor Roll Roxboro Central Graded School: 1927

      The following named pupils have been neither absent nor tardy during the first month of school. Names are given by grades and teachers having the respective section in charge:

      Third Grade: Miss Maude L. Montague, Teacher

      Geraldine Brooks, Lillie Carver, Elizabeth Clayton, Ruth Davidson, Elsie Hassan, Mary King, Hazel McKee, Inez Parham, Marie Spencer, Mary E. Strum, Vivian Stanfield, Zenith Wrenn, Constance Zaytoun, Buddy Allgood, Palma Barrett, A. Y. Clayton, Jr., John Day, Hezekiah Dixon, Bedford Jones, Joseph King, Howard Tolbert, Harold Tolbert, Bennie Wrenn, Alvah Young.

      Richmond Frederick, Fletcher Winstead, Anette Cushwa, Dot Clayton, Frances Critcher, Louise Featherston, Gladys Perkins, Caroline Michaels, Mary Miller.
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      Sixth Grade, Dept. A: Mrs. V. O. Blalock, Teacher

      Beulah Bradley, Annie Long Bradsher, Emily Bradsher, Margaret Hannah Critcher, Frances Featherstone, Cleo Fox, Lois Hamlin, Cleo James, Florence Johnson, Christine Long, Isadore Long, Ethel Moore, Louise Oliver, Roxie Pulliam. Sue M. Richmond, Helen Thompson, Mary Sue Tuck, Sallie Whitt, D. Arcy Bradsher, John Bradsher, James Brooks, Carroll Carver, Ransome Frederick, Billy Harris, John James, J. V. King, Dick Long, Billy Miller, Otha Murray, Robert Talbert, Robert Walker.

      Source: The Roxboro Courier (Roxboro, North Carolina), November 2, 1927, p.2.
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      "The Roxboro Graded School began its first session yesterday, with a heavy enrollment. Prof. N. C. Newbold is superintendent, and has associated with him some of the best educators in Person county. With such an efficient man at its head and able lady assistants, the Roxboro Graded School is bound to prove a long felt blessing to this community. The school is divided into nine grades."

      Source: The Durham Sun (Durham, North Carolina) 16 September 1902, Tuesday, p. 1.

      "The following have been re-elected as teachers in the Roxboro graded school for the next scholastic year: Miss Alice Ferrell, of Raleigh; Miss Augusta M. Trotter, of Reidsville; Miss Josephine Cole, of Danville, Va.; Miss Julia Johnson, of Denver; Misses Anna Meritt and Eugenia Bradsher, of Roxboro. Prof. N. C. Newbold, the superintendent, was also re-elected."

      Source: "Roxboro Social Items," The Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, North Carolina), 22 May 1905, Monday, p. 9.
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      While it is believed that Richmond Stanfield Frederick graduated from Roxboro High School (Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina), no supporting documentation is known. On his 1972 marriage license to his second wife Zena Lee Puckett Morris Broome he indicated four years of high school completed. However, it is possible that his education was cut short by the death of his father in 1931 when young Frederick was only thirteen years old. But, there was an older brother who could have worked and aided the family financially. At the time of the 1940 United States Federal Census his occupation was shown as: "laborer/Plush mill." This most likely was Collins & Aikman. We do know that Richmond Stanfield Frederick was working at the Collins & Aikman Ca-Vel plant north of Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina, at the time of his first marriage: 9 October 1941. Collins & Aikman, a textile manufacturer, opened business in 1927 (merging with an existing textile business in Person County, North Carolina). Soon Richmond Stanfield Frederick and wife Sally Womack Moorefield Frederick moved to Baltimore, Maryland, where their first child was born August 2, 1942. There he was employed at the Glen L. Martin Aircraft Company. His job description there is not known.
      _______________

      The Glenn L. Martin Company (also known as The Martin Company from 1957-1961) was an American aircraft and aerospace manufacturing company founded by aviation pioneer Glenn L. Martin, and operated 1917-1961. The Martin Company produced many important aircraft for the defense of the US and allies, especially during World War II and the Cold War. During the 1950s and 1960s, the Martin Company moved from the aircraft industry into the guided missile, space exploration, and space utilization industries. In 1961, the Martin Company merged with American-Marietta Corporation, a large industrial conglomerate, forming Martin Marietta Corporation. In 1995, Martin Marietta merged with aerospace giant Lockheed to form the Lockheed Martin Corporation.

      During World War II, a few of Martin's most successful designs were the B-26 Marauder and A-22 Maryland bombers, the PBM Mariner and JRM Mars flying boats, widely used for air-sea rescue, anti-submarine warfare and transport. The 1941 Office for Emergency Management film Bomber was filmed in the Martin facility in Baltimore, and showed aspects of the production of the B-26.

      Martin ranked 14th among U.S. corporations in the value of wartime production contracts. The company built 1,585 B-26 Marauders and 531 Boeing B-29 Superfortresses at its new bomber plant in Nebraska, just south of Omaha at Offutt Field. Among the B-29s manufactured there were all the Silverplate aircraft, including Enola Gay and Bockscar, which dropped the two war-ending atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.

      Source: Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Glenn_L._Martin_Company&oldid=1017961783 [Accessed 24 September 2021]
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      Bomber

      When this documentary was filmed Richmond Stanfield Frederick was working (or was about to begin work) at the Glenn L. Martin plant in Baltimore, MD.

      "Bomber" by National Archives and Records Administration. Publication date 1941. Shows details in the manufacture of B-26 medium bombers at the Glenn L. Martin Company plant in Baltimore, Maryland. A commentary written by Carl Sandburg emphasizes the strength and usefulness of the plane. Includes scenes of bombers in England taking off to attack Germany.
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      World War II Service

      Photograph (World War II)

      Camp Croft, South Carolina 1944

      RTC 36B Flag

      (for larger image, click on photograph)
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      Richmond Stanfield Frederick (second row from bottom, fifth soldier from right (taller than others)) at Camp Croft, South Carolina 1944.

      At the time of his selection for the United States Army, Richmond Stanfield Frederick was living in Baltimore, Maryland, and employed at the Glen L. Martin Aircraft Company plant (where he had worked since the early days of the war). The enormous factory was located eleven miles northeast of downtown Baltimore in the town of Middle River, having been established there in 1929. He was inducted for service 25 May 1944 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Basic training was at the Fort Croft, South Carolina US Army Infantry Replacement Training Center. He was assigned to RTC Rifle Company B, 36th Battalion, 7th Infantry Training Regiment, United States Army (platoon not known). No record of his early days in the Army has been found. However, as basic training was seventeen weeks, he presumably was stationed at Fort Croft until near the end of September 1944 (thus being in basic training on 6 June 1944, the D-Day Invasion of Europe). And, he may have been at Fort Croft when word was received that his older brother, Army Air Force Lieutenant William Ransome Frederick, had died 9 September 1944 in England, when the B-24 Liberator Bomber he was piloting crashed during a night training exercise.

      Private Frederick then was deployed to the European Theater. He probably was transported by troop ship, but no record thereof is known. One reasonably can assume that he arrived in Europe October-November 1944 as part of the US Army Fourth Infantry Division (nicknamed "Ivey Division"), commanded by Major General Raymond O. Barton. The Fourth Infantry Division included the 8th Infantry Regiment, 12th Infantry Regiment, 22th Infantry regiment, and supporting units. During the battle of Hurtgen Forest, CCR of the 5th Armored Division was attached. Private Frederick was wounded in action in Germany on December 1, 1944, being shot in neck. The family owns the actual bullet that caused the near-mortal wound. The engagement in which Private Frederick was wounded is not known. While he probably spent some time in a field hospital on the continent, he was moved by airplane, and was in a hospital in England (115th US Station Hospital) when awarded the Purple Heart on 28 December 1944. The Purple Heart Certificate documents that his combat injury was sustained December 1, 1944, in Germany. Fighting by the Fourth Infantry Division on German soil during the fall of 1944 included the Battle of Hurtgen Forest (September 1944 - February 1945) (first Army). This engagement generated at least 33,000 U.S. casualties. However, where in Germany Private Frederick was wounded may never be known. The National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri, is unable to locate his file. In July 1973, a fire destroyed 85% of the Army and Army Air Force individual personnel files.

      Private Frederick eventually returned to the United States aboard U.S. Army Hospital Ship Wisteria.1 By February 5, 1945, he was receiving care at Kennedy General Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, where he remained until being released September 7, 1945. His honorable discharge from the United States Army is dated 5 September 1945. As Frederick's wound involved the spinal cord, paralysis always was a fear, and did manifest itself in some loss of motion on one side (arm and, especially, hand). For purposes of his military pension, Frederick was deemed 100% disabled. However, he managed to lead an active and productive life, with few realizing he was disabled. During his service and convalescence, the Frederick family (wife and young daughter) lived with the parents of Mrs. Sally Moorefield Frederick just south of Yanceyville in Caswell County, North Carolina. And, it was on this farm that the veteran Frederick lived until the early 1950s.

      Award of Purple Heart

      By direction of the President, under the provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, as amended, the Purple Heart is awarded to:

      Private Richmond S. Frederick, 34864504, Infantry, United States Army, for wounds received as a result of enemy action on 1 December 1944, in Germany.

      By order of Lt. Colonel McMahon
      December 28, 1944

      Headquarters
      115th (US) Station Hospital
      Southern District, UK Base

      From Frederick Family Bible: "Richmond S. Frederick was wounded in action Dec. 1st 1944, was discharged from Kennedy Hospital Memphis Tenn. 100 percent Disability Sept. 10th 1945"
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      Army Hospital Ships:


      The list below identifies newly-built Army Hospital Ships and/or converted vessels. The first date reflects the War Department designation as a Hospital Ship, followed by the WDGO and date, the name of the vessel, the year built, the speed, the patient capacity, the port of departure, the destination, and finally the date of embarkation.

      23 Feb 44 - WDGO 40 dated 17 May 44, UA Army Hospital Ship ’USAHS Wisteria‘, ex-William Osler, built 1943 (former Liberty ship) - 11 knots - 588 patients - New York > United Kingdom 16 Jul 44 - 219th Med Hosp Ship Co (decommissioned 22 Jul 46)

      Source: https://www.med-dept.com/articles/ww2-hospital-ships/ [Accessed 14 August 2018].
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      U. S. Army Hospital Ships, 1 November 1944

      Much of the therapeutic value of the homeward passage lies in the abrupt change from front-line hardship to the comparative luxury of the Army hospital ship. Clean beds, good food, the quiet comfort of an ocean voyage where every need is met, all this must be heaven to the returning soldier after long months in combat. Once the patient is on board his spirits are never allowed to flag. A public address system carries the latest song hits through loudspeakers into every ward. All ships have musical instruments on hand, and on practically every voyage the ambulant patients stage their own amateur hour. The MARIGOLD boasts her own volunteer band with a crooner and with its own arrangements of everything from "boogie-woogie" to the ranking favorite overseas, the story of "Lili Marlene."

      A ship's newspaper helps keep the patients both informed and entertained. The ACADIA, for example, publishes the "Fore and Aft," the LARKSPUR, the "News Buoy," and the WISTERIA, the "Salt Shaker." Issued in mimeographed form, such publications contain the latest news briefs, poems and stories contributed by patients, Army cartoons, and informational material on the hospital facilities at Charleston. A Red Cross worker circulating through the wards lends a kindly hand, gives instruction in handicraft, and supplies reading matter from the ship's library. The Red Cross representative also provides recreational material, hometown newspapers and musical instruments, together with such necessities as combs, toothbrushes, shaving cream, and razor blades. Games, quiz programs, and similar entertainment serve to while away the hours at sea. The religious element is not forgotten. Protestant and Catholic Chaplains minister to the members of their respective faiths and aot as special service officers.

      Larson, Harold. "Army Hospital Ships in World War II." Office of the Chief of Transportation, Army Service Forces, December 1944.
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      Pvt. Frederick Gaining Strength

      (for larger image, click on photograph)
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      "Mrs. Richmond S. Frederick and Mrs. John Clayton left today for Memphis, Tenn., where they will visit Pvt. Richmond S. Frederick, who is in a hospital there. Pvt. Frederick recently returned from overseas where he was wounded."

      The Roxboro Courier (Roxboro, N.C.), 25 January 1945
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      Pvt. Frederick Is Now Improving

      "Mrs. Richmond S. Frederick and small daughter, Diane spent Easter with Mrs. John Clayton and Mrs. Stella Frederick. Mrs. Frederick, who has been with her husband Pvt. Richmond S. Frederick, at Kennedy General Hospital for the past two months, came home especially for their daughter, Diane. They both left Tuesday morning to return to Memphis, where they will remain as long as it is necessary for Pvt. Frederick to remain in the hospital there. Mrs. Frederick brought good news to the sisters [sister] and mother of Pvt. Frederick who is now walking and gradually gaining strength."

      Source: The Courier-Times (Roxboro, North Carolina), 9 April 1945 (Monday).
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      "Pvt. Richmond S. Frederick has returned to Kennedy General Hospital, Memphis, Tenn., after spending a thirty day furlough here with relatives. His wife and baby will remain in Yanceyville for the present."

      The Courier-Times (Roxboro, N.C.) 26 August 1945
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      The following was published in Personals section of The Courier-Times (Roxboro, North Carolina) 24 September 1945:

      "Pvt. Richmond S. Frederick, son of Mrs. Stella Frederick, has received his discharge from Kennedy General Hospital. Pvt. Frederick of the Fourth Division, was wounded in Germany in December, 1944."
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      Kennedy General Hospital was dedicated January 27, 1943, and named for Brigadier General James M. Kennedy, a US Arm surgeon.

      Certain World War II hospitals became specialized centers, including Kennedy, which received neurological, thoracic, and orthopedic surgical patients. Most patients arrived in Memphis by long trains that stopped at Normal Station near Memphis State College. The windows of the coaches were blacked out, and corpsmen would open them to pull out stretcher cases. Patients had their insignia removed as a security precaution. Long lines of ambulances waited at the siding every day.

      The hospital's Public Relations Office undoubtedly helped orchestrate The Commercial Appeal Heroes Phone Fund. This joint venture between Kennedy, the newspaper, Southern Bell, and the Red Cross collected over $12,00 to establish a fund for free long distance calls from patients to their families. The service lasted at least into the 1950s, after Kennedy had become a VA hospital.

      Source: Fagan, Michele. "Kennedy General Hospital and the War Years, 1941-1945." Tennessee Historical Quarterly, vol. 51, no. 2, Tennessee Historical Society, 1992, pp. 113-23, http://www.jstor.org/stable/42626995 [Accessed 21 September 2021].
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      Kennedy General Hospital Historical Marker

      The South Campus of the University of Memphis repurposes WWII-era US Army hospital buildings to educate students. The south campus is primarily used for professional and continuing education students. The historic marker reads as follows:

      "Gen. James M. Kennedy Hospital

      A U.S. Army hospital on this site treated more than 44,000 combat veterans during World War II. Opened Jan. 23, 1943, it was named for the late Brig. Gen. James M. Kennedy, distinguished Army surgeon and veteran of both the Spanish-American War and World War I. The hospital was turned over to the Veterans Administration in 1946. The property became the South Campus of Memphis State University in 1967."
      _______________

      Built in 1943, Kennedy was a state-of-the-art medical facility and one of the best equipped hospitals in the nation. The hospital treated all types of casualties but specialized in surgery, with an average of 30 operations a day. There was a big center for the treatment of spinal cord injuries and the second largest neuropsychiatry service in the nation. Kennedy was like a city within a city with it's own power station, fire department, housing for 2,000 personal, bowling alleys, movie theatre, recreation halls, etc. Closed in 1967 ... now demolished.

      Source: http://historic-memphis.com/memphis-historic/hospitals/hospitals.html [Accessed 21 September 2021].
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      Kennedy General Hospital US Army
      The SHOWBOAT

      Vol. 1, No. 16
      Farewell Edition
      June, 1946

      Source: https://digital.tcl.sc.edu/digital/collection/GJP/id/361 [Accessed 21 September 2021].
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      Post-War

      Photograph (Caswell Hardware)

      After his service in World War II and his extensive recuperation period, Richmond Stanfield Frederick first worked at the Yanceyville service station owned by Lee and Red Thomas. He later moved to Caswell Hardware and Implement Company in Yanceyville as the dealership's Parts Manager. His final job (March 15, 1965) was Shipping and Receiving Manager at Hanover Mills, from which he retired.
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      Roxboro Personals: "Mr. and Mrs. Richmond Frederick and baby, of Yanceyville, spent Sunday with Mrs. John Clayton. Source: The Courier-Times (Roxboro, NC), 31 December 1945.
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      Obituary

      Yanceyville, N.C. -- Richmond Stanfield Frederick, 64, Route 1, Yanceyville, died Thursday evening at his residence south of Yanceyville on Highway 62. Born November 24, 1918, he was the son of William Waters Frederick and Mary Stella Stanfield of Person County. He was a member of the Yanceyville First Baptist Church and a retired employee of Hanover Mills. Prior to his employment at Hanover Mills, he for many years was the Parts Manager at Caswell Hardware and Implement Company. He also served as a member of the local Selective Service Board and as President of the Caswell County Fair Association. He also was a member of the VFW, American Legion, the Forty and Eight, and the Moose Lodge. He served in Europe during World War II, being seriously wounded in France [Germany].

      Survivors include his wife, Zena Broome Frederick of the residence; one son, Richmond Stanfield Frederick, Jr., Brentwood, England; and two daughters, Diane Bell, Providence, and Joyce Horne, Danville, Virginia. Also, two stepsons, Ronnie W. Morris, Danville, Virginia, and Steve D. Broome, Greensboro, and one step-daughter, Joan B. Marley, Danville. He was predeceased by his wife of thirty years Sallie Moorefield Frederick, his parents William Waters Frederick and Mary Stella Stanfield Frederick, an older brother William Ransom Frederick (killed in World War II) and an older sister Mona Minerva Frederick Clayton.

      The funeral will be held 4 p.m. Saturday at Hooper Funeral Chapel, Yanceyville, by the Reverend Carroll Spivey, with interment in Highland Burial Park, Danville, Virginia. The family will receive friends 7:30 - 9 p.m. today at the funeral home.
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      Daddy Dear

      Where are you my Daddy Dear?
      Are you far, or are you near?

      As you soar through worlds unknown,
      Traveling to your heavenly home.

      How I long to see your face,
      Hear your voice, feel your embrace.

      Do you see the nail scarred hands of Christ?
      Where He hung and died on the cross in our place?

      Did you see the tears that flowed today,
      When the Angels came and took you away?

      Yet, it seems as though I can hear you say:
      "Weep not for me my child, not for me anyway."

      But go out and tell others of Jesus's love.

      And I'll see you all someday in Heaven above
      _______________

      Thought Dad was lost, But he told me differently here. Then at funeral preacher confirmed saying had been saved 2 weeks ago.

      Author: Virginia Joyce Frederick (1983)
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      "Slip Stick"

      I always was fascinated by my father's "desk." This really was a small oak chest of drawers. In it were things of mystery: his Purple Heart medal (which I did not understand); the bullet that almost took his life in France during World War II; his bills and accounts; and, most importantly for a little boy: a strange stick with numbers and parts that slid against each other. I did not know for many years that this was a slide rule and that my father knew more than I ever would.

      Richmond Stanfield Frederick, Jr. (September 29, 2019)
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      1Before being converted to a hospital ship in 1943, Wisteria had been named the William Osler and was a liberty ship. It was laid up (mothballed) in 1947 by the U.S. government and finally scrapped in 1969 in Portland, Oregon. The vessel had been built by Bethlehem-Fairfield Shipyards Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, as Hull #954, with engines provided by Ellicott Machine Corp, Baltimore, Maryland.

      During World War II the Army Transport Service operated twenty-four hospital ships that were manned by civilian crews, employees of the Army Transport Service. The medical staff were Army personnel. The hospital ships were operated under the provisions of the Hague Convention X of 1907, which specified identifying markings. These proved inadequate, so large illuminated red crosses on deck were added for aerial visibility at night. Hospital ships were allowed to carry medical supplies as cargo for the battlefield. Most of the hospital ships were former passenger liners/troopships which were disarmed, repainted, and rearranged for hospital use. Six liberty ships were converted for hospital use. All patients carried on this type of ship were not allowed to be berthed more than two decks below the boat deck and accommodation for the carriage of wounded had been previously agreed between the Chief of Transportation and the Surgeon General.

      See: Hospital Ships of World War II: An Illustrated Reference, Emory A. Massman (1998).
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      For more photographs of this family go to the Frederick Family Photograph Collection.
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      Roxboro -- The citizens of Person County and the Rotary Club of Roxboro on Saturday honored the men and women who served in the military during World War II with the unveiling of a monument in Person County Courthouse Square witnessed by some 500 people. Saturday -- May 30 -- was chosen because that date was the traditional Memorial Day before the federal government changed it to become the last Monday in May. The memorial was the culmination of a project -- "Ride of Honor" -- that began May 9, 2007 when the Rotary Club of Roxboro took more than seven motor coaches filled with WWII veterans, family and friends to Washington, D.C., to view the National WWII Memorial there. Private citizens, civic organizations, city and county agencies and community businesses helped the Rotary Club fund the project. After the trip, which free for the veterans, there was some money left over to fund a permanent monument on the Courthouse lawn. "This is a special day in Roxboro/Person County," said a project officer, Rotarian Margaret McMann. "We have had an opportunity to say 'Thank you' to our military men and women who served during World War II. As a community we have been able to leave a lifetime legacy for future generation so see, in the form a very simple but poignant monument that in some small way may show the veterans and their families their sacrifices are truly appreciated." Source: The Herald-Sun (Roxboro, Person County, North Carolina) 31 May 2009.
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      The US Army 4th Infantry Division was reactivated on 1 June 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia, under the command of MG Walter E. Prosser. 4th ID was reorganized to the Motorized Infantry Division TO&E on 1 August 1940. 4 ID was assigned-along with 2d Armored Division, to the I Armored Corps. 4 ID moved to Dry Prong, Louisiana The Fourth Division arrived in the UK in early 1944. It took part in the Normandy Invasion landings at Utah Beach, with the 8th Infantry Regiment of the 4th Division being the first surface-borne Allied unit to hit the beaches at Normandy on D-day, 6 June 1944. Relieving the isolated 82d Airborne Division at Sainte-Mère-Église, the 4th cleared the Cotentin peninsula and took part in the capture of Cherbourg on 25 June. After taking part in the fighting near Periers, 6-12 July, the division broke through the left flank of the German Seventh Army, helped stem the German drive toward Avranches, and by the end of August had moved to Paris, and gave French forces the first place in the liberation of their capital.

      During the liberation of Paris in WWII, Ernest Hemingway took on a self-appointed role as a civilian scout in the city of Paris for his friends in the 4 ID. He was with the 22nd Infantry Regiment when it moved from Paris, northeast through Belgium, and into Germany. The 4th then moved into Belgium through Houffalize to attack the Siegfried Line at Schnee Eifel on 14 September, and made several penetrations. Slow progress into Germany continued in October, and by 6 November the division entered the Battle of Hurtgen Forest, where it was engaged in heavy fighting until early December. It then shifted to Luxembourg, only to meet the German winter Ardennes Offensive head-on (in the Battle of the Bulge) starting on 16 December 1944. Although its lines were dented, it managed to hold the Germans at Dickweiler and Osweiler, and, counterattacking in January across the Sauer, overran German positions in Fouhren and Vianden. Halted at the Prüm River in February by heavy enemy resistance, the division finally crossed on 28 February near Olzheim, and raced on across the Kyll on 7 March. After a short rest, the 4th moved across the Rhine on 29 March at Worms, attacked and secured Würzburg and by 3 April had established a bridgehead across the Main at Ochsenfurt. Speeding southeast across Bavaria, the division had reached Miesbach on the Isar on 2 May 1945, when it was relieved and placed on occupation duty. Writer J.D. Salinger served with the division 1942-1945.

      World War II Casualties

      1. 4,097 Killed in Action
      2. 17,371 Wounded in Action
      3. 757 Died of Wounds
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      Camp Croft, South Carolina
      US Army Infantry Replacement Training Center (Boot Camp)

      During World War II Camp Croft south of Spartanburg, South Carolina, trained Army recruits. This is now a South Carolina State park with the same name. Some portions of the park contain the original quonset huts (1/2 metal tube structures).

      The following is from the Camp Croft, South Carolina US Army Infantry Replacement Training Center website:

      Active Duty (1941-1946)

      The camp consisted of two general areas: a troop housing (cantonment) area with attached administrative quarters and a series of training, firing, and impact ranges. The cantonment area housed 18,000 to 20,000 trainees as well as cadre and service personnel. Along with the barracks and requisite headquarters buildings for the 16 training battalions, the camp buildings included the post headquarters, post office, post exchange, service clubs, movie theaters, chapels, hospitals, dental clinic, Red Cross, and numerous others. Construction continued until May 1941, when construction of 674 buildings under the original contracts was declared complete. One month later the first soldiers, those from the 33rd Training Battalion, graduated from the 13 week course and were sent to join the 28th Division in Pennsylvania.

      Between 65,000 and 75,000 troops moved through the Croft IRTC every year. Most of the trainees were "selectees" meaning they were men drafted into service through Selective Service rather than volunteers. The men reported first to an induction center, probably in their hometown, and then were sent to a Reception Center. Reception processing ideally required four to five days during which time the men were tested, interviewed and finally recommended for an initial duty or training assignment. The next stop for many selectees was one of the nine IRTCs, all located in the south and Southwest. Courses initially lasted 12 to 13 weeks, but were cut to 8 weeks immediately following Pearl Harbor. Soon after a 17 week program was adopted and remained in place until the end of the war. Selectees they had little choice of what unit they desired to join and after graduation they were sent to supplement infantry units already in the field. The men were designated as "loss replacements" if they were replacing troops lost to combat, sickness, furlough, or discharge. Likewise they were known as "fillers" if they were being used to bring a unit up to full strength which had never been at full strength before.

      Initially the staff, training cadre, and service personnel were almost all from the regular (volunteer) Army. Tension sometimes existed between the regular army cadre and the new draftees and a gradual process began to send the best graduates to a three week cadre school. Eventually most of the cadre was made up of selectees.

      While all the men learned the same basic infantry skills, there was also specialty training which prepared each man to be a member of Rifle, Heavy Weapons, Cannon, Antitank, Headquarters, or Service Company. Some of the training battalions and companies were set up to provide individual training. For example, the 27th Battalion (Service Company) trained men to become specialist members of an infantry company and consisted of Co. A - motor mechanics, Co. B - chauffeurs (truck drivers), Co. C - pioneers and clerks, and Co. D - cooks, armorers, artificers and buglers. Ten of the original sixteen battalions were designated as Rifle Companies. Each battalion was also assigned to a training regiment for administrative purposes as follows:

      6th Infantry Training Regiment - 32nd, 33rd, 34th, 35th Battalions (briefly included the 71st)
      7th Infantry Training Regiment - 36th, 37th , 38th, 39th, 40th
      8th Infantry Training Regiment - 26th, 27th, 28th
      9th Infantry Training Regiment - 29th, 30th, 31st, 41st
      10th Infantry Training Regiment - 49th, 50th

      A major organizational change came in September 1942 when the Infantry Replacement Training Center and the Fourth Service Command units were split into two distinct departments. This meant the IRTC headquarters unit managed the administration and training of selectees while the Service Command took responsibility for post facilities.

      The firing ranges at Croft consisted of pistol, rifle, machine gun, mortar, antiaircraft, and antitank ranges. Weaponry used on the ranges included hand and rifle grenades; 45 caliber (cal) pistol; 30 cal M1, M1 carbine, and BAR; 30 cal light and heavy machine gun; 50 cal machine gun; 60 mm and 81 mm mortar; bazooka; 37 mm antitank gun; and the 105 mm infantry howitzer. The camp also contained 2 gas chambers and a gas obstacle course.

      Officers, enlisted men, nurses, and WACs were not the only residents of the camp. Possibly as many as 500 German POWs, some the Afrika Corps, were housed at Croft and used as labor on local farms, orchards, and forests. Their presence caused concerns among some of Spartanburg residents who disliked the idea of "those guys" being close to their homes.

      Immediately after the war, the camp served as a major separation point for soldiers being discharged from the service. First Sergeant Joseph P Hudock from Pennsylvania became the first soldier to receive his discharge at the post on September 19, 1945.
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      PFC Richmond Stanfield Frederick was inducted for service in the United States Army May 25, 1944, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Basic training was at the Fort Croft, South Carolina US Army Infantry Replacement Training Center. He was assigned to RTC Rifle Company B, 36th Battalion, 7th Infantry Training Regiment, United States Army (platoon not known). No record of his early days in the Army has been found. However, as basic training was seventeen weeks, he presumably was stationed at Fort Croft until near the end of September 1944 (thus being in basic training on 6 June 1944, the D-Day Invasion of Europe). And, he may have been at Fort Croft when word was received that his older brother, Army Air Force Lieutenant William Ransome Frederick, had died 9 September 1944 in England, when the B-24 Liberator Bomber he was piloting crashed during a night training exercise.

      After being wounded in Germany December 1, 1944 (shot in the neck),* PFC Richmond S. Frederick most likely was treated at a field medical facility. He then was transported by airplane, but to where is not fully understood. However, by December 28, 1944 (when he was awarded the Purple Heart),** he was being treated at the US 115th Station Hospital a few miles southeast of Tavistock, Devon, England (on the Dartmoor). Locally called Plasterdown Army Hospital/Camp, the now demolished hospital facility was between Tavistock and Horrabridge.

      PFC Frederick returned to the United States aboard US Army Hospital Ship "Wisteria". When the ship departed England is not known. And unknown is the ship's arrival date on the United States east coast. However, by January 25, 1945, Frederick was a patient at Kennedy General Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee.

      By late July 1945 he was physically able to enjoy a thirty-day furlough, returning to Yanceyville, North Carolina. By August 20, 1945, he had returned to Kennedy General Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. Final discharge was September 7, 1945. He was honorably discharged from the United States Army September 5, 1945.
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      *He was part of the US Army Fourth Infantry Division (nicknamed "Ivey Division"), commanded by Major General Raymond O. Barton.

      **The date the Purple Heart was awarded may have been after PFC Frederick departed the US 115th Station Hospital in England.
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      North Carolina Birth Index, 1800-2000
      Name: Richard [Richmond] Stanfield Frederick
      Date of Birth: 24 Nov 1918
      Birth County: Person
      Roll Number: B_C078_66001
      Volume: 5
      Page: 637

      1930 United States Federal Census
      Name: Richmond Frederick
      Home in 1930: Roxboro, Person, North Carolina
      Age: 11
      Estimated Birth Year: abt 1919
      Relation to Head of House: Son
      Father's Name: Will W
      Mother's Name: Stella
      Race: White
      Household Members: Name Age
      Will W Frederick 50
      Stella Frederick 49
      Ransome Frederick 13
      Richmond Frederick 11

      1940 United States Federal Census
      Name: Richmond Frederick
      Age: 21
      Estimated Birth Year: abt 1919
      Gender: Male
      Race: White
      Birthplace: North Carolina
      Marital Status: Single
      Relation to Head of House: Son
      Home in 1940: Roxboro, Person, North Carolina
      Street: Court Street, Roxboro, North Carolina
      Occupation: Laborer, Plush Mill [Collins & Aikman]
      Resident on Farm in 1935: No
      Attended School: No
      Highest Grade of School Completed: 8
      Private Work: Yes
      Hours Worked (March 24-30): 38
      Weeks Worked: 36
      Income: $576
      Other Income: No
      Inferred Residence in 1935: Roxboro, Person, North Carolina
      Residence in 1935: Same House
      Sheet Number: 15B
      Household Members: Name Age
      W W Frederick 58
      Richmond Frederick 21

      Collins & Aikman opened 1927 in Person County, North Carolina, with its first plant (Baker Plant) north of Roxboro in the community that would become known as Ca-Vel (Collins, Aikman, anv velvet produced: Ca-Vel).

      World War II Service Record
      Name: Richmond S Frederick
      Birth Year: 1918
      Race: White, citizen
      Nativity State or Country: North Carolina
      State: Maryland
      County or City: Baltimore City
      Enlistment Date: 25 May 1944
      Enlistment State: North Carolina
      Enlistment City: Fort Bragg
      Branch: No branch assignment [United States Army/Infantry]
      Branch Code: No branch assignment [United States Army/Infantry]
      Grade: Private
      Grade Code: Private
      Term of Enlistment: Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law
      Component: Selectees (Enlisted Men)
      Source: Civil Life
      Education: 2 years of high school
      Marital Status: Married
      Height: 88
      Weight: 199
      Medals: Purple Heart and Others

      Death Record
      Name: Richmond Stanfield Frederick Sr.
      Death Date: 29 Sep 1983
      Death County: Caswell
      Death State: North Carolina
      Death Age: 64
      Burial Location: Burial out of state [Danville, Virginia]
      Birth Date: 24 Nov 1918
      Birth Location: North Carolina
      Residence County: Caswell
      Residence State: North Carolina
      Father: W. W. Frederick
      Gender: Male
      Race: White
      Marital Status: Married
      Social Security Number: 244059567
      Autopsy: No
      Institution: Home
      Attendant: Medical Examiner
      Source: Ancestry.Com North Carolina Death Collection, 1908-1996

      Additional Death Record
      Name: Richmond Stanfield Frederick, Sr.
      Age: 64 Years
      Death Date: 29 September 1983
      Place of Death: Caswell, North Carolina
      Birth Date: 24 November 1918
      Gender: Male
      Race: White
      Marital Status: Married
      Autopsy: No
      Hospital: Home
      Attendant: Medical Examiner
      Burial: Burial out of state (Danville, Virginia)
      Father: Frederick
      State of Birth: North Carolina
      Residence: Caswell, North Carolina
      Social Security Number: 244-05-9567
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