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Roper, Moses

Roper, Moses

Male Abt 1815 - 1891  (~ 76 years)

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  • Name Roper, Moses  [1
    Birth Abt 1815  Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Name Henry 
    Reference Number 16389 
    Death 15 Apr 1891  Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Burial Mount Hope Cemetery, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Unmarked grave in the itinerant-pauper section
    Person ID I16066  Caswell County
    Last Modified 16 Apr 2024 

    Father Roper, Henry H.,   b. 1788, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this locationd. Bef Jul 1845, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location (Age < 57 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Living 
    Relationship natural 
    Family ID F7602  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Price, Ann Stephen,   b. Abt 1819, Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this locationd. 1882, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location (Age ~ 63 years) 
    Marriage 21 Dec 1839  Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Reference Number 153648 
    Notes 
    • Moses Roper Marriage License

      England & Wales Marriages, 1538-1940
      Name: Anne Stephen Price
      Gender: Female
      Birth Date: abt 1819
      Age: 20
      Father's Name: William Price
      Spouse's Name: Moses Roper
      Spouse's Age: 24
      Spouse's Father's Name: Henry Roper
      Marriage Date: 21 Dec 1839
      Marriage Place: Bristol, Gloucestershire, England
    Children 
     1. Roper, Maria Elizabeth,   b. 23 Dec 1840, Kensington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this locationd. Sep 1847 (Age 6 years)  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
    +2. Roper, Ann,   b. Abt 1845   d. 1927, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location (Age ~ 82 years)  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
     3. Roper, Maria,   b. 1849, Canada Find all individuals with events at this locationd. Dec 1863, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 14 years)  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
     4. Roper, Ada Victoria,   b. 1851, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
     5. Roper, Alice Maud Mary,   b. 1853  [Father: natural]  [Mother: natural]
    Family ID F7601  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart
    Last Modified 16 Apr 2024 

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBirth - Abt 1815 - Caswell County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarriage - 21 Dec 1839 - Bristol, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDeath - 15 Apr 1891 - Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Moses Roper
    Moses Roper Book
    Moses Roper Book
    Moses Roper: Anderson Attempting to Shoot Him
    Moses Roper Being Beaten by Gooch
    Moses Roper

    Documents
    Moses Roper Marriage License
    Moses Roper Marriage License
    Moses Roper Marriage Record
    Moses Roper Marriage Record
    Moses Roper Advertising Flyer 1839
    Moses Roper Advertising Flyer 1839

    Newspapers
    Moses Roper Death Notice
    Moses Roper Death, The Boston Globe, 16 April 1891
    Moses Roper Book
    Moses Roper Illness Thought To Be Leprosy, The Cambridge Transcript (Cambridge, Vermont), 15 April 1891
    Moses Roper Illness Not Leprosy, Harrisburg Daily Independent (Harrisburg, PA), 14 April 1891
    Moses Roper: The Dog Was His Guide, The Boston Globe (Boston, MA), 13 April 1891
    Moses Roper Death, The Fall River Daily Herald (Fall River, MA), 16 April 1891
    Moses Roper in England, The Hampshire Advertiser (Southampton, Hampshire, England), 13 July 1839
    Moses Roper in England, Sheffield and Rotherham Independent (Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England), 19 May 1838
    Moses Roper in England, Sheffield and Rotherham Independent (Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England), 21 April 1838

  • Notes 
    • Moses Roper (c.1815 - 1891)

      Roper 2

      Moses Roper Escape from Slavery

      Moses Roper Webinar April 2021

      (click on photograph for larger image)
      _______________

      Additional References

      CCHA Weblog

      Chronology of the Life of Moses Roper

      Wikipedia Article

      Speeches in England

      Online Version of Narrative of My Escape from Slavery

      Roper Family Research

      Moses Roper - The Lost Opportunity of British Abolition

      Moses Roper Advertising Flyer

      Black Voices and the Local Anti-Slavery Movement
      _______________

      From a descendant of Henry Roper and Nancy, Rachel Farley's half-sister:

      "Henry had an illegitimate son, Moses Roper, by Rachel Farley's half sister Nancy. Nancy was a daughter of one of Hezekiah Farley's slaves, and Nancy may have been Hezekiah's daughter. Henry and Rachel inherited Nancy from Hezekiah's estate. Moses's story is on the Internet and recorded by the University of NC. Henry Roper married (1st) Rachel Farley, daughter of Hezekiah Farley. They had 10 children together before Rachel died. Then, Henry Roper married (2nd) Mary Ann Elmore and they had at least 3 children together. I have one line which descends from Rachel Farley, and another from Mary Ann Elmore, so Henry Roper is my grandfather twice. Uncle Moses Roper was one fourth black, but he was sold as a slave. Uncle Moses eventually escaped after many agonizing years as a slave, and made it to England where he married an English woman."
      _______________

      Moses Roper (1815-?) was born in Caswell County, North Carolina, the son of a mulatto house servant (African-Indian) and her master, Henry Roper, a planter who exchanged mother and son for slaves from a neighboring plantation when Roper was six years old. As an adolescent, Roper led a peripatetic existence, repeatedly being sold or traded throughout the South before he was returned to Caswell County in 1832. During the next two years, Roper made many attempts to escape, each time being punished, then sold or exchanged to some other plantation owner in the county. At the end of 1833, Roper was purchased by a north Florida trader, whose bankruptcy led to the eighteen-year-old slave's employment as a steward on a New York-bound packet. Once anchored in New York, Roper jumped ship and ran for freedom-first stewarding a canalboat on the Hudson River, then working as a farmhand in Vermont, until he saw newspaper advertisements for his capture as a fugitive slave. Roper left Vermont and briefly settled in New Hampshire before moving to Boston. There he began his affiliation with the abolitionist movement by signing the constitution of the American Anti-Slavery Society. But by late 1835, Roper, fearful of arrest and return to slavery, signed up as a steward on the vessel Napoleon and sailed for England.

      Several prominent British abolitionists assisted Roper once he arrived, especially Dr. John Morrison, John Scoble, and George Thompson, who were impressed with Roper's desire to secure an education and to serve the African missions. With the help of these British patrons and the assistance of Dr. Francis Cox, who bore a significant part of the expense, Roper successfully attended boarding schools in Hackney and Wallingford and later spent some time at University College in London during 1836. Throughout this period, Roper also attended many antislavery meetings and gave speeches on his slave experiences to people who were as impressed by his stature (Roper was 6'5") as they were by his account - an account that was one of the first given by a former slave to British reform audiences.

      In the summer of 1837, Roper published a narrative of his life and used a lecture tour to promote it. The book was also printed in Philadelphia and sold in America. In 1839 Roper married an Englishwoman from Bristol; and five years later, claiming to have given "upwards of two thousand" antislavery lectures during his British stay, he moved his family (the Ropers had one child at the time) to Canada West-although he had originally hoped to use proceeds from his Narrative to finance the purchase of a farm on the Cape of Good Hope. He returned to England at least two more times, arriving in 1846 "to settle some private matters" (probably to negotiate a new printing of his Narrative) and, again in 1854, to lecture.

      Source: C. Peter Ripley, et al., eds., The Black Abolitionist Papers: Vol. I: The British Isles, 1830-1865, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992.
      _______________

      Roper married Ann Stephen Price in Bristol, England on December 21, 1839. He had four daughters, one born on the Atlantic Ocean on the way to Canada c1844 and with two born in Quebec and the youngest born in Nova Scotia between 1850 and 1857. He thrice returned to the British Isles, first in 1846 to "settle private matters" (possibly to arrange a new edition of his Narrative); then in 1854 and sometime before 1861, to lecture. The final time, he brought his wife and daughters back, and the 1861 British Census finds them living with his father-in-law (William Price) in Merthyr Tydfil, Glamorgan, Wales while Moses is in Cambridge, England, staying in a boarding house.

      Sometime after 1861, Moses Roper returned to the United States, where he lived the life of an itinerant lecturer, travelling from place to place discoursing on various subjects, including "Africa and the African People", "Causes of the Colors of the Races," and on the "Holy Land." It appears that after his return to the States, his family never heard from him again; by 1871, his wife has remarried and when his youngest daughter Alice Mary Maud Roper married in 1883, Roper's name was listed with the comment "(deceased)."

      It also appears that he met only middling success as a lecturer and that for several years before his death, Moses Roper wandered through New England working at whatever he could find; he was working as a field hand on the farm of James T. Skillings in Franklin County, Maine near the town of Strong when "his strength gave out" in April of 1891. Roper, in very poor physical condition with a little more than a hundred dollars in his pocket and accompanied only by a dog named Pete (described as "his faithful companion") was placed on a train to Boston, Massachusetts.

      Roper and his dog made it to Boston, but he was found unconscious in a railroad station and taken to the Boston City Hospital. When he was found, it was noted that he was "well protected from the cold, wearing four shirts, two overcoats and three pair of pantaloons." It was also found that he was suffering from "a complication of diseases of the heart and kidneys and also from eczema" which caused his death on April 15, 1891. His dog had to be dragged away from his bedside.

      Source: Moses Roper Wikipedia Article
      _______________

      Speeches by Moses Roper Delivered at Baptist Chapel, Devonshire Square, 26 May 1836 and at Finsbury Chapel, London, England, 30 May 1836

      Moses Roper, b. 1815

      From: Ripley, C. Peter, et al., eds. The Black Abolitionist Papers, Vol. I: The British Isles, 1830-1865, Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1985. Used by permission of the publisher. Originally published in Patriot (London), 1 June 1836.

      Mr. M. ROPER addressed the meeting, and stated a number of facts which had come under his own knowledge, demonstrative of the horrors and cruelties of American slavery. One case which he mentioned, was that of a slave who occasionally preached to his fellow-bondsmen. His master threatened that if he ever preached on the Sabbath again, he would give him 500 lashes on the Monday morning. He disobeyed the order, however, and preached, unknown to his master. He became alarmed, ran away from Georgia, and crossed the river into South Carolina, where he took refuge in a barn belonging to a Mr. Garrison. Mrs. Garrison saw him in the barn, and informed her husband of it. Mr. Garrison got his rifle and shot at him. The law required that they should call upon a slave to stop three times before they fired at him; Mr. Garrison called, but he did not stop. The ball missed him, and Mr. Garrison then struck him with the gun and knocked him down. The slave wrested it from him. and struck him (Mr. G.) with it. The slave was taken up for it; his master went after him; Mr. Garrison purchased him for 500 dollars, and burned him alive.

      . . . .

      Mr. ROPER then stood forward, and observed with considerable warmth, that Dr. Cox did pay a portion towards his education, but that should not hinder him from advocating the cause of his mother, brethren, and sisters, now in bondage. (Loud cheers.) He was grateful to Dr. Cox for that which he was doing for him; but at the same time his principles were not to be bought. (Cheers.) There was not a Christian Society in America, which did not hold slaves, except the Society of Friends. (Cheers.) In Salem, a town in South Carolina, containing perhaps 20,000 Quakers, there was not a single slave, though they were surrounded by a slave-holding population. (Cheers.) He had run away from his master, and was going to see his mother in North Carolina. He had to pass through the town of Salisbury, where there was a Quaker in gaol who was to be executed on the following Friday, for having given a slave a free pass. (Shame, shame.) Mr. Thompson had given them an account of some bad slaveholders; he (Mr. R.) would tell them of some good ones. A master with whom he once lived, Mr. Beveridge, in travelling from Apalache to Columbia, having to pass through the Indian nations, it was necessary for him to take arms. He was taken exceedingly ill, and could neither stand up nor sit down. He had a trunk with him containing 20,000 dollars, and he (Mr. R.) took the pistols and protected his master and his master's property. When he arrived at Columbia, his master becoming embarrassed in circumstances, sold him on a block; that was his kindness to him (Mr. R.) for saving his master's life and protecting his property. Another good master was Colonel M'Gillon, a Scotchman, who held about 300 slaves, and who used to boast that he never flogged them. His mode of punishing them was to get a rice hogshead, into which several nails were driven about a quarter of an inch through, and the slave then being fastened in, he used to roll them down a very steep hill. (Shame, shame.) At one of the Revival meetings (of which he had heard so much since he came to this country), two ladies of colour came in and took their seats in the pew for inquirers. Holding down their heads, they were not observed; but some ladies coming in, and noticing their colour, left the pew directly. (Hear, hear.)

      Titles by Moses Roper

      A Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper, from American Slavery by Moses Roper, b. 1815

      Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper, from American Slavery. With an Appendix, Containing a List of Places Visited by the Author in Great Britain and Ireland and the British Isles; and Other Matter by Moses Roper, b. 1815
      _______________

      The police of Boston found a man in a helpless condition at the Eastern railroad depot Saturday and took him to the city hospital. Several physicians who saw him expressed the opinion that he was suffering from leprosy. His name is Moses Roper, aged from sixty-five to seventy years. He had just come from Strong, where he had worked on a farm. He had been suffering from the grip which left him in a terrible condition, his limbs being swollen and mortified. He said the party for whom he worked tired of caring for him, placed him on a train and sent him with his dog to Boston. Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) 1891 April 15 (Page 1).

      Moses Roper Death Notice (NYT 17 Apr 1891)

      Bangor Daily Whig and Courier (Bangor, Maine) (15 Apr 1891)

      (for larger image, click on photograph)
      _______________

      Dear Shannon:

      Thanks for the message.

      I agree that a Moses Roper historical marker is appropriate, and we had the support of the late Dr. H. G. Jones, Ph.D.. However, when discussing another matter with Ansley Wegner (NC Office of Archives & History) a while back, I brought up the issue of a Moses Roper marker. She stated that the problem would be with the location -- the same issue you highlighted. For example, the Archibald Debow Murphey marker in Semora states that Murphey was: "Born 7/10 mi. S."

      I used the Murphey marker in Semora as an example because of the following from Roper's autobiography:

      "At the Red House I left the cart, and wandered about a long time, not knowing which way to go and find my mother. After some time, I took the road leading over Ikeo Creek. I shortly came up with a little girl, about six years old, and asked her where she was going; she said, to her mother's, pointing to a house on a hill, half a mile off. She had been at the overseer's house, and was returning to her mother. I then felt some emotions arising in my breast, which I cannot describe, but will be explained in the sequel. I told her I was very thirsty, and would go with her to get something to drink. On our way I asked her several questions, such as her name, that of her mother; she said hers was Maria, and that of her mother's Nancy. I inquired, if her mother had any more children? she said five besides herself, and that they had been sold, that one had been sold when a little boy. I then asked the name of this child? she said it was Moses. These answers, as we approached the house, led me nearer and nearer to the finding out the object of my pursuit, and of recognising in the little girl the person of my own sister."

      The reference to "Red House" and "Ikeo [probably Hyco] Creek" are informative. Note that Roper describes the road leading over Ikeo Creek, but does not state that he crossed the bridge. This could place his mother's house south of Red House and west of Hyco Creek. Sounds like Semora. Of course, knowing the location of the white Roper property in the area could be determinative. Also, there may be additional clues in the Roper autobiography, which I have not read in a while.

      This is such a worthwhile project. Please let me know if I can help further.

      Best regards,

      Rick Frederick

      PS The other matter being discussed with Ansley Wegner was the language of the Caswell County Courthouse historical marker: "Erected about 1861. Murder of Sen. J. W. Stephens here in 1870 led to martial law and Kirk-Holden 'War.'" I suggested that "Murder" was an inaccurate word as it is a legal term and there is no basis for concluding that Stephens was murdered. While he was killed, he was not murdered. I was told to submit a formal request for a change (which I did not do), but to expect any change to be major: focusing on Stephens and not the courthouse.
      _______________

      Birth Record
      Name: Roper, Moses
      Father: Roper, Henry H
      Birth Date: 1815
      City: Caswell
      State: NC
      Country: USA
      Source: Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection - Births [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2001

      Personal Record
      Name: Moses Roper
      Spouse: Ann Stephen Price
      Parents: Henry H Roper ,
      Birth Place: Caswell, NC
      Birth Date: 1815
      Marriage Place: Bristol, Bristol
      Marriage Date: 21 December 1839

      1861 England Census
      Name: Moses Roper
      Age: 45
      Estimated Birth Year: abt 1816
      Relation: Married
      Gender: Male
      Where born: North Carolina, United States
      Occupation: Lecturer on Slavery in the United States
      Marital Status: Married
      Civil Parish: Cambridge St Benedict
      County/Island: Cambridgeshire
      Country: England
      Registration district: Cambridge
      Sub registration district: St Mary the Great
      ED, institution, or vessel: 1
      Household schedule number: 87
      Household Members: Name Age
      Moses Roper 45

      In the above 1861 English census record Moses Roper, age forty-five, is shown living in the household of Thomas Wright (a wheelwright).

      The following record is unconfirmed and placed here for research purposes only:

      1851 Census of Canada East, Canada West, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia
      about Moses Roper
      Gender: Male
      Age: 36
      Estimated Birth Year: abt 1816
      Birthplace: United States
      Province: Canada East (Quebec)
      District: Deux Montagnes County
      District Number: 33
      Sub-District: Lachûte
      Sub-District Number: 527
      Page: 17
      Line: 13
      Roll: C_1147
      Schedule: A
      _______________

      Henry H Roper, b. 1788, , Caswell, NC. He married (1) Nancy, NOT MARRIED. He married (2) Rachel Farley, 4 Oct 1810, in , Caswell, NC, b. Abt 1792, d. ABT 1831, Caswell, NC. He married (3) Mary Ann Elmore, 9 Nov 1832, in , Caswell, NC, b. Abt 1806, d. Abt 1881. Henry died Bef Jul 1845, , Caswell, NC.

      (1) Moses Roper, (son of Henry H Roper and Nancy) b. Abt 1815, Caswell County, NC. He married Ann Stephen Price, 21 Dec 1839, in Bristol, Bristol, England, b. Abt 1819, Bristol, , England, d. , , , Canada. Moses died , , , Canada.
      _______________

      Moses Roper was born a slave in Caswell County, North Carolina. His father was the plantation owner and his mother one of Roper's black slaves. Soon after he was born, Roper's wife tried to kill Moses and he was only saved by the intervention of his grandmother.

      Roper died six years later and Moses and his mother were sold to different people. Moses became the property of a slave trader who took him to Georgia. Being a mulatto, Moses was difficult to sell and so he was left with a Mr. Steed, who ran a boarding-house in Washington. After working as one of Steed's house slave Moses was hired out to a doctor and a tailor.

      Eventually Moses was sold to a man called Gooch who owned a cotton plantation in South Carolina. Roper made several escape attempts and each time he was caught he was severely punished. In August, 1831 Roper was successful and managed to find his mother but soon afterwards he was recaptured and taken back to Gooch. This time he received 200 lashes of the whip and would have been killed but for Gooch's wife pleading for his life.

      Gooch sold Roper and he became the property of Marvel Louis of Greenville, South Carolina, who employed him as a domestic slave. Later he was transferred to a man called Beveridge who owned three steamboats. Roper worked as a steward on one of these boats and this enabled him to escape.

      Roper reached New York in August, 1834. After moving to Philadelphia he published his autobiography, Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper (1838).
      _______________

      The proposed text of the Apalachicola, Florida, historical marker (30 October 2021):

      Moses Roper (1815-1891) was a freedom fighter, lecturer, author, and survivor of U.S. slavery who dedicated his life to abolition. The son of white planter Henry Roper and an enslaved woman named Nancy, Roper was born in Caswell County, North Carolina but was sold to several different enslavers during his youth. He tried to escape between 16-20 times but was captured and subjected to horrendous abuse at the hands of his enslavers.

      In 1832 Roper was purchased by Robert Beveridge, a Scotsman living in Apalachicola who owned three steamboats. Steamboats transported cotton grown in southern Georgia and Alabama to the port of Apalachicola and carried passengers, mail, and cargo up and down the river system. The vessels docked along this stretch of Apalachicola’s riverfront.

      Roper was made a steward on board the Versailles and the knowledge he gained from this aided his later successful escape.

      After Beveridge went bankrupt in 1834, Roper was sold to a violent North Florida planter. He managed to escape and walked 500 miles from Marianna, Florida to Savannah, Georgia, where he leveraged his experience from the Apalachicola River and secured a job on the Fox, a schooner that sailed for New York in August 1834. The following year, he sailed to England where he obtained an education.

      In 1837 Roper published one of the best-selling slave narratives in history, Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper, from American Slavery. By 1848 he had sold 38,000 copies.

      Roper was one of the first survivors of U.S. slavery to organize extensive lecture tours in the British Isles before activists like Frederick Douglass, who became famous for his transatlantic sojourn between 1845-1847. Roper travelled to every corner of Britain and used his Narrative to inform the transatlantic public about slavery. He lectured over 2,000 times across Britain and Ireland and was uncompromising in his graphic descriptions of the torture and violence he witnessed and was subjected to. In response to critics who disbelieved his testimony, he replied “you have heard the slaveholder’s side of the story, it is time for the slaves to speak.”

      Marrying Ann Price, an Englishwoman, they settled in Canada with their four daughters. He later moved back to the United States. Moses Roper died in Boston in 1891.

      Source: https://www.change.org/p/support-the-state-historical-marker-for-abolitionist-moses-roper-in-apalachicola-florida?utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=custom_url&recruited_by_id=8ff4a4b0-257c-11ec-818a-d9d327a64496 [Accessed 30 October 2021].
      _______________

      Moses Roper in London 1838

      "Moses Roper, who was received, on his rising, with loud cheers, addressed the audience (which he said was the largest he had had to stand before) at considerable length, repeating some of the statements he made last week, and explaining others, and giving a number of additional facts, which, for want of time, and a press of other matter we are compelled to omit. Mr. Roper observed, with reference to his former address, that he had not -- as we stated last week, and as he was generally understood to say, -- actually walked through Cheapside in irons, but that he had offered to do so, of persons who denied his statements would not be convinced in any other way."

      The Leicestershire Mercury (Leister, England) 26 May 1838.
      _______________

      WorldConnect Post-Em
      Date: 01 June 2014
      Database: caswellcounty
      Individual: I16403
      Submitter: Gloria Sheehan
      Email: dulciesgirl@hotmail.com
      Note:
      Ann Stephen Price's parents were actually William Stephen Price and Ann Kindon (the Kindon name was later included in the name of one of Ann and Moses' daughters, Annie):

      Ann Stephen Price, "England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975"
      Name: Ann Stephen Price
      Gender: Female
      Birth Date: 26 Jan 1819
      Birthplace: Broad Mead Baptist, Briston, Gloucester, England
      Father's Name: William Stephen Price
      Mother's Name: Ann Kindon
      Indexing Project (Batch) Number: C09251-1
      System Origin: England-ODM
      GS Film number: 0825378 (RG4 3765), 0825379 (RG4 2871), 0825379 (RG4 2923), 0825380 (RG4 2697)
      _______________

      Massachusetts, US, Death Records 1841-1915
      Deaths Registered in the City of Boston for the Year eighteen hundred and ninety one

      No: 99
      Date of Death: April 15
      Date of Record: No Entry
      Name and Surname of the Deceased: Moses Roper
      Sex (and other than white): M
      Condition (whether single, married or widowed): W
      Age: 75
      Disease, or Cause of Death: Cardiac and Pulmonary
      Residence, and Place of Death: City Hospital
      Occupation: Lecturer
      Place of Birth: No. Carolina
      Name and Birthplace of Parents: No Entry
      _______________

      Anne: Henry had an illegitimate son, Moses Roper, by Rachel Farley's half sister Nancy. Nancy was a daughter of one of Hezekiah Farley's slaves, and Nancy may have been Hezekiah's daughter. Henry and Rachel inherited Nancy from Hezekiah's estate. Moses's story is on the Internet and recorded by the University of NC. Henry Roper married (1st) Rachel Farley, daughter of Hezekiah Farley. They had 10 children together before Rachel died. Then, Henry Roper married (2nd) Mary Ann Elmore and they had at least 3 children together. I have one line which descends from Rachel Farley, and another from Mary Ann Elmore, so Henry Roper is my grandfather twice. Uncle Moses Roper was one fourth black, but he was sold as a slave. Uncle Moses eventually escaped after many agonizing years as a slave, and made it to England where he married an English woman. You listed all of Henry Roper's children as being from Rachel Farley, which is not true. Too bad about Uncle Moses Roper, we cannot correct history. Moses became the most famous of the Ropers. The Burtons, Farleys, and Ropers are my most numerous ancestors because they intermarried so many times. Larry Choplin, Shalimar, FL. Source: Anne Washburn Email Message 25 March 2008 Transmitting Larry Choplin Email Message 24 March 2008.

  • Sources 
    1. Details: Moses Roper Wikipedia Article.

    2. Details: English marriage license of Moses Roper and Ann Stephen Price (1839).