Caswell County Genealogy
 

Share Print Bookmark
Winstead, Colin Neblett

Winstead, Colin Neblett

Male 1885 - 1956  (71 years)

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Winstead, Colin Neblett  [1
    Birth 1885  [1
    Gender Male 
    Reference Number 11684 
    Death 1956  [1
    Burial Cedars Cemetery, Milton, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I11466  Caswell County
    Last Modified 16 Apr 2024 

    Father Winstead, Edwin Daniel,   b. 23 Jun 1852, Person County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this locationd. 17 Jan 1925, Danville, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location (Age 72 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Neblett, Annie M.,   b. 15 Aug 1861   d. 11 May 1945 (Age 83 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Reference Number 87336 
    Family ID F5768  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBurial - - Cedars Cemetery, Milton, Caswell County, North Carolina Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Four Milton Men: Works Progress Administration 1932 (left-to-right): Sol Angle; Colin Winstead; Ches Matlock; and Will Morton
    Colin Neblett Winstead
    Winstead House (Milton, NC)
    E. D. Winstead House (Milton, NC)
    Winstead House (Milton, NC)

  • Notes 
    • Colin Neblett Winstead (1885-1956)

      Colin Neblett Winstead (1885-1956)

      Four Milton Men: WPA 1932

      (for larger image, click on photograph)
      _______________

      Second Photograph: Four Milton Men: Works Prgoress Administration 1932 (left-to-right): Sol Angle; Colin Winstead; Ches Matlock; and Will Morton.
      ______________

      Assumed to be a son of E. D. Winstead and Annie M. Unknown based upon proximity in the Cedars Cemetery (Milton, North Carolina) and the respective birth dates. This relationship has now been confirmed.

      Wilson-Winstead-Upchurch House

      This house was built by Dr. John Wilson [actually by his father] and is on the north side of Broad Street. It is a two-story gabled brick structure of around 1840. Edward D. Winstead (1852-1925) and wife Annie M. (1861-1945) owned this home for a number of years and later their son, Colin Neblett Winstead (1885-1956) lived in the home. Source: Milton, North Carolina: Sidelights of History, Charles B. Motley (1976) at 88.
      _______________

      E. D. Winstead House (Milton)

      (for larger image, click on photograph)
      _______________

      Another house of great interest was the Winstead home, now owned by Jim Upchurch. That was remarkable for the family who lived there. Colin Winstead, the son, was a character unlike anyone else I ever knew. His favorite entertainment was catching little girls and kissing them. Somewhat less than welcome attention. I can remember on one occasion scratching his face so badly that it bled. He was an idiosyncrasy to be sure. His mother was the gentlest of women, dominated by her business-like husband, and very quiet. They were members of Christ Episcopal Church, and Colin was he usher who took collection. In that Church are several steps leading to the pulpit, and Colin would walk along down the aisle, shaking the collection plate as he went trying to count the money (and there was very little, mostly coins) only to stumble up the steps to give the plate to the minister. That church is now the Milton Woman's Club.

      Source: "Milton Memories" by Jean Scott, The Caswell Messenger (Yanceyville, North Carolina), December 2008.
      _______________

      When Milton Presbyterian Church in those days comes to mind I see all those dear people, so much a part of our lives and just where they sat in church. Nearly everyone had a chosen seat and the regular attendants honored those seats.

      Mr. Claytor, long time minister, read his sermons and left his written word in the shelves of the pulpit, where nosy youngsters easily found them. There was Miss Whit, his wife, and Miss Annie Irvine, his sister-in-law, the picture of dignity and Southern gentility. There were Mary Williams, Mrs. Whitlock, Colin Winstead, and Mr. Lewis Walker, the druggist, who nodded off during all sermons. There was Ethel Gillespie in the choir. And Bernice Oliver and Evelyn Gusler, sitting together, and both as neat as neat as could possibly be. There was Mr. Jim Brandon who always sat near my grandmother, Mrs. Frank Jones. There was Mr. Kilby, Sunday school Superintendent for most of my early life. There were our mothers: Mrs. Angle, Miss Edith, Mrs. Kilby (a member of the Episcopal Church, but that met only once a month). There was Miss Ellen Donoho, and Miss Em, her sister-in-law. Miss Em played the piano occasionally and had the shortest, stubbiest little fingers I always wondered if she could span an octave.

      Another member of the congregation was Charlie Lea, the black sexton, sitting about halfway up the stairs to the balcony. He tolled the church bell every Sunday, and stoked the furnace in winter. All part of what we could expect every Sunday. Women in summer dresses, anything but revealing, and the men were always in coat and tie. We, the children and young people, had our Sunday clothes, probably homemade, but kept for Sundays and special occasions. What an ordinary and wonderful way of life.

      Source: "Milton Memories" by Jean Scott (The Caswell Messenger, 4 July 2012).
      _______________

      Milton Memories by Jean Scott

      Milton has always had "characters," some long before my time, legends of the town. and my life there have been many. Most of them lovable and kind and thoughtful, but maybe a little eccentric. Whatever, they made up the fabric of our beloved little town.

      Addison (Charlie) Lipscomb and his sister, Rebekah (Tiddlywinks) were known to every child in Milton for their penny candy case. Tiddlywinks kept those little glass dishes sparkling clean and Charlie kept them filled with a myriad of penny candy. With careful thought a nickel's worth could fill a little brown bag. They both were endlessly patient with us, but also with our children. They were children of J. J. and Rebekah Landsdell Lipscomb. Others in the family were John and Landsdell and Clem. Faithful members of the Presbyterian church they were always there, rain orshine. Tiddlywinks was Sunday school treasurer and careful to give each class correct report. She was a graduate of East Carolina Teachers College. I never knew her to have her own class, but she was often the substitute teacher, and I am afraid we did not make that very easy for her. She loved her family and all its many connections. Both Charlie and she were gentle souls who loved children.

      Another character we all remember is Colin Winstead, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Winstead. Colin never had employment that I remember, but he loved children, so much so that we ran from him for he kissed us. After we had a junior choir at the Presbyterian church he sat near the back and made faces at us. so the choir would just have to giggle.

      Mattie (Martha Connally) Newman made a great impact on several generations. She and my mother were lifelong friends and cousins (very strong recommendation in our part of the South). "Miss Mattie" as she was known to the children at least, was large in stature with a heart just as big. She was the medical adviser to every parent near and far after we had no resident physician. Mattie had served in the Army Nurse Corps in France during World War I, and much later in life was the resident nurse on Mattinicus Island off the coast of Maine. For years she taught the Bible class at the Milton Methodist church. She retired as postmaster from Milton.

      There are many others. John Fleming was a real character. He was a member of the Fleming family who made their home in the State Bank. He and his brothers were salesmen and made their living "up North," then he came back here. He had three wives, not especially unusual, but the third one impressed us. She had what I know now a very well trained beautiful voice. When she played and sang at the Presbyterian church she was spectacular in her choice of music and the way she played the piano, swaying way over to one side than back over to the other. Quite a display for 8 and ten year olds.

      Source: The Caswell Messenger (Yanceyville, North Carolina), 3 October 2018.
      _______________

      "I so remember the older bachelor, a true character that Mother would get Daddy to take plates of food over to him, Colin Winstead. He wore a 3 piece suit & stood out on the sidewalk. A bicycle hit him & he never recovered." Source: Ed Thomas 3 February 2021 Facebook Post.
      _______________

      1900 United States Federal Census
      Name: Collin N Winstead
      Home in 1900: Milton, Caswell, North Carolina
      Age: 14
      Birth Date: Jun 1885
      Birthplace: North Carolina
      Race: White
      Ethnicity: American
      Gender: Male
      Relationship to Head of House: Son
      Father's Name: Edward D
      Father's Birthplace: North Carolina
      Mother's Name: Annie M
      Mother's Birthplace: Virginia
      Marital Status: Single
      Residence : Milton Village, Caswell, North Carolina
      Household Members: Name Age
      Edward D Winstead 47
      Annie M Winstead 38
      Collin N Winstead 14
      Sterlin Mcf Winstead 6

      1910 United States Federal Census
      Name: Collin Winstead
      Age in 1910: 24
      Estimated Birth Year: abt 1886
      Birthplace: North Carolina
      Relation to Head of House: Son
      Father's Name: E D
      Father's Birth Place: North Carolina
      Mother's Name: Annie M
      Mother's Birth Place: Virginia
      Home in 1910: Milton, Caswell, North Carolina
      Marital Status: Single
      Race: White
      Gender: Male
      Household Members: Name Age
      E D Winstead 57
      Annie M Winstead 48
      Collin Winstead 24

      World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
      Name: Colin Neblett Winstead
      County: Caswell
      State: North Carolina
      Birth Date: 5 Jun 1885
      Race: White
      FHL Roll Number: 1765626

      1920 United States Federal Census
      Name: Colin N Winstead
      Home in 1920: Milton, Caswell, North Carolina
      Age: 34 years
      Estimated Birth Year: abt 1886
      Birthplace: North Carolina
      Relation to Head of House: Son
      Father's Name: Edward D
      Father's Birth Place: North Carolina
      Mother's Name: Annie M
      Mother's Birth Place: Virginia
      Marital Status: Single
      Race: White
      Sex: Male
      Able to read: Yes
      Able to Write: Yes
      Household Members: Name Age
      Edward D Winstead 67
      Annie M Winstead 58
      Colin N Winstead 34

  • Sources 
    1. Details: Milton, North Carolina: Sidelights of History, Charles B. Motley (1976) at 88.