Caswell County Genealogy
 

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Wilson, Elizabeth Sears (I19970)
 
2

Burlington (July 26, 2008 - 11:23PM) - Mr. Othal Gwynn Phillips, 78, passed away Friday, July 25, 2008, at 4:24 p.m. at his home following several years of declining health. A native of Caswell County, he is survived by his wife, Betty Shoe Phillips; his daughter, Betsy Phillips Steele and husband Eric of Greer, S.C.; his son, Timothy S. Phillips and wife Linda of Elon; and five grandchildren, Lauren Phillips, Ian Phillips, Harrison Phillips, Nathan Steele and Jacob Steele; two sisters, Sarah Phillips Stanfield and Dollie Phillips Johnson; and one brother, Joe T. Phillips; along with two dear sisters-in-law, and loving nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, Robert P. Phillips and Dollie Powell Phillips; and three sisters and five brothers.

The family will receive friends at McClure Funeral Home in Graham on Sunday, July 27, 2008, from 6 to 8. The funeral service will be conducted at the McClure Funeral Home Chapel in Graham on Monday, July 28, 2008, at 11 a.m. Officiating will be the Rev. Paul Baker and the Rev. Rosser Clapp. Burial will follow in Alamance Memorial Park. Other times they will be at the residence.

The family would like to thank Hospice and Palliative Care of Alamance/Caswell for their professional and compassionate care as well as family and many friends for their support and personal expressions of affection during his illness. 
Phillips, Othal Gwynn (I36262)
 
3

North Carolina, Birth Indexes, 1800-2000
Name: Allie Mae Daniel
Gender: Female
Race: White
Event Type: Birth
Birth Date: 30 Dec 1916
Birth County: Catawba [Caswell]
Parent1 Name: Walter Bristo Daniel
Parent2 Name: Rosa Josephene Daniel
Roll number: NCVR_B_C021_68003
Volume: 1
Page: 1084

North Carolina, Death Indexes, 1908-2004
Name: Allie Mae Wade [Allie Mae Daniel Wade]
Gender: Female
Race: White
Marital Status: Widowed
Social Security Number: 242186463
Father's Last Name: Daniels
Age: 73
Date of Birth: 30 Dec 1916
Residence County: New Hanover
Residence State: North Carolina
Date of Death: 23 Aug 1990
Death City: Wilmington
Death County: New Hanover
Death State: North Carolina
Autopsy: No
Institution: General Hospital
Attendant: Physician
Burial Location: Burial in state
Source Vendor: NC Department of Health. North Carolina Deaths, 1988-92
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Note the issue raised by the reported births of two siblings of Lillian E. Daniel: Melvin Daniel (16 June 1916); and Allie Mae Daniel (30 December 1916). The date for Melvin Daniel is from his gravemarker. The date for Allie Mae Daniel probably derives from a delayed birth certificate. However, physically, it is possible that both birth dates are correct. One family member (niece) claims she was born in 1918, but without providing documentation. 
Daniel, Allie Mae (I66293)
 
4 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I68373)
 
5 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I16522)
 
6 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family (F17739)
 
7
Caswell_County__NC___Marriage_of_William_Graves_to_Miss_Isbell_Gr aves___26_Nov_1805 Weekly Raleigh Register, 9 Dec 1805_Page_1_Image_0002

(for larger image, click on photograph)
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Family (F3640)
 
8
After the death of her husband, her nephew Milton Stamps lived with her in Rockingham Co., N.C. This grandchild was named in the will of Henry Williams.
 
Slade, Mary (I2331)
 
9
Joel C. Rice (1762-1833)

Death location also seen as Mercer County, Alabama. Purportedly had eleven children.
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RICE, JOEL -- "Departed this life on Saturday morning the 22nd inst., at his residence in the Big Cove, Madison County, Alabama, of a lingering and protracted illness, Joel Rice, Esq., in the 71st year of his age. One of the first settlers in the county, Fought in the Revolution, for the liberty we now enjoy and has one down to his reward." Source: Huntsville Southern Advocate, June 25th, 1833.
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"Following his return to Davidson County from the 1789 North Carolina Constitutional Convention, Joel the next year became a Justice of the Peace for Davidson County and later a trustee for Nashville. It was in 1793 that he married the widow, Mary Elizabeth Green Pryor Hickman, and took on the nurture and support of her three orphaned children. Hers was a sad story. Elizabeth was a daughter of Green Pryor of Orange Co., North Carolina and Susannah Perkins of Goochland Co., Virginia. Her father died young (before 1771), leaving the widowed Susannah with two small children, she and her brother John. Elizabeth's paternal grandparents were John and Margaret (Gaines) Pryor. John was an early North Carolina settler and served in the North Carolina Assembly in 1769-1770. Her maternal grandparents were Nicholas and Bethenia (Harding) Perkins of Virginia. A surveyor and Revolutionary War veteran, Edwin was killed by Indians in the spring of 1791. The area he was killed became Hickman County later that year. They had moved to Nashville when he died.

Joel and his wife were still living at Hickman's Station, eight miles west of Nashville when this region became part of Tennessee in 1796. Then in 1810 , Joel bought 320 acres in Madison Co., Alabama. In 1818, Territorial Governor William Wyatt Bibb appointed him sheriff of the newly formed Lauderdale Co. Joel bought a lot in the town of Florence in July of 1818, but by 1819 he was back in Madison Co., where he is burried near the town of New Hope.

The children of Joel Rice and Mary Elizabeth Ricce were Green Pryor Rice, Elisha Hickman Rice, William M. Rice, Joel L. Rice, Agatha P. Rice (m. Jesse G. Scott), Tulliola A. Rice (m. W.H. Powers), Cornelia Rice (m. Allen Green), Hypasia Rice, Susan Rice, George Washington Rice, and Andrew Jackson Rice.

Joel's father, Thomas Rice of St. David's District in Caswell Co., North Carolina, is a bit if a genealogical puzzle. He had come from hanover Co., Virginia in 1775 and was a farmer. Living in Caswell Co. at the same time is another Thomas Rice, believed to have been the long termed sheriff of the county. He, too, is supposed to have come from Hanover Co. and is thought to have had two wives, Joyce and Abigail. His children are easily identifiable. All but the last two Elizabeth and Joyce, had names that began with the letter 'Z'...Zeri,Zilla,Zerauch,Zipporah,Zara, Zadock, Zaza, & Zibe.

It gets more complicated: A 1786 Caswell Co. census lists three Thomas Rices, one living in Gloucester District and two in St. David's. This multiplicity of Thomas Rices has created difficulty for both amateur and professional genealogists, as witnessed by various membership applications for DAR and other patriotic organizations. The difficulty goes back to Hanover Co., Virginia, where we find various entries in the "Small Book" listing one or more Thomas Rices in the early 1700s. The Thomas Rice who was sheriff died in 1800 and the Thomas who was Joel Rice's Father died in 1804. His will probated in October of 1804, does not name a wife, perhaps suggesting that he was a widower.

Nine of Thomas Rice's 10 children are named in his will. His son John, the land speculator who owned the site of Nashville, was a bachelor about the age 35 when he was killed by Indians in 1792, so died before his father. In addition to Joel, the other children were Elisha (m. Anne Collier), William H., Rebecca (m. John Windsor), Sarah (m. Hugh Gwynn), Marcey (m. Francis Nunn), Lucy (m. John DeBow & John Scobey), Nathan (m. Sarah Williamson) and Mary (m. Moses Oldham).

There is another genealogical glitch in the Joel Rice Family. One of his descendants employed a professional genealogist to compile a genealogical table of Joel's progenitors. An elaborate family tree was prepared on the premises that Joel was a son of Hezekiah Rice of Caswell Co. Unfortunately the eroneous conclusion was published in Miller's History and Genealogy and long accepted as fact by family member."

Source: Rice Family Books
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http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/index/RICE-SOUTHERN
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In 1789 John Rice obtained 80,000 acres of land on the Big Hatchie River for a partnership composed of him self, his brothers Joel and Ellisha, and Jesse Benton. He removed from Caswell County to Nashville in 1785, engaged in trading, land speculation, and surveying, and was killed by Indians seven years later. He owned nearly 50,000 acres exclusive of his rights in these lands. After his death Judge John Overton, Gen. Andrew Jackson, and others set up claims to the Hatchie lands, which could not be finally adjudicated until the extinguishment of the Indian title in 1818. In 1805, Rice’s devisees and heirs contracted with Solomon Debow, Rice’s stepson [probably his nephew], to give him 70% of all lands which he could recover for them, and on the same day, Debow formed a partnership with his brother, Stephen, his cousin, Alexander Murphey, and Capt. Haralson, to effect this object. After the Chickasaw treaty, Solomon Debow instituted a suit for 15,000 acres of the Hatchie lands in the Supreme Court at Nashville in the name of the devisees and heirs [Hugh Gwynn and others v. John Overton and others]. In September 1821, he assigned to Judge Murphey his interest in the contract of 1805 in partial payment for Murphey’s losses by him through suretyship. Subsequently Judge Murphey acquired the interests of Stephen Debow and Capt. Haralson and also the rights of all devisees and heirs of John Rice to the lands involved in the suit. [History of Memphis, 1873, pp. 7-25.]
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Rice, Joel C. (I17399)
 
10
North Carolina Marriage Collection, 1741-2004
Name: Mary Palmer
Spouse: George Price
Marriage Date: 26 Sep 1823
Marriage County: Caswell
Marriage State: North Carolina
Source Vendor: County Court Records - FHL # 0478484-0478488
Source: County Court Records at Yanceyville, NC & Family H 
Family (F18123)
 
11  Phelps, Wyatt Edward (I4527)
 
12 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6606)
 
13  Myers, Hartwell Carr (I7900)
 
14  Donoho, Isabella Garland (I11502)
 
15  Donoho, Kate Morrison (I11503)
 
16 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I18746)
 
17  Bird, General Jehu (I20243)
 
18 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I24454)
 
19  Lea, William (I27330)
 
20  Compton, Artemus Aquilla (I27604)
 
21  Burton, Hutchins (I32644)
 
22 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I35197)
 
23  Cobb, Joseph P. (I36387)
 
24  Watlington, Armistead (I44360)
 
25 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I44624)
 
26 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I55626)
 
27 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I57160)
 
28 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I58785)
 
29 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I60978)
 
30 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I61376)
 
31  Aldridge, William (I61831)
 
32 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I63096)
 
33 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I64219)
 
34  Family (F5204)
 
35  Family (F11147)
 
36 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I30684)
 
37 "(4) Polly Lea married James Seargent and their daughter Phebe married her cousin Lawrence Lea."

Source: The Heritage of Caswell County, North Carolina, Jeannine D. Whitlow, Editor (1985) at 351 (Article #437, "James Lea" by Katharine Kerr Kendall).

Based upon the above there is some confusion as to the mother of Phoebe Sargent.
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"William Lea, Sr. son of James Lea Sr b 1747 Leasburg, N. C. Orange Co. N.C. Militia Rev. War, d 1806 Leasburg, N. C. (Will Bk E - p 289 Caswell Co) m Caty Van Hook, Issue: Lawrence (Larry) Lea Member North Carolina Legislature 1804, m Caswell Co, 23 Sep 1793 Phoebe Sergeant dau of Polly Lea Sargeant. He d 1808 Caswell Co and she m (2) Samuel Bowers, Issue: Washington Lea, William Lea, James Madison Lea m Polly Van Hook, Artemsia Lea. Family left Leasburg probably settled in Ala. James Lea m. Caswell Co 17 Aug, 1795 Nancy Dobbins, widow Burd. Issue: Franklin Lea, Aaron Lea, Nancy Lea. Eunice (Nice) Lea m William Donaho 8 Nov, 1797 Caswell Co. (Edwin Holmes Lea to F. P. Otken, marriage dates by AEC. Will Bk E p 418, Caswell Co.)"

"Polly Lea dau of James & Anne Lea of Leasburg b c 1752, m James Sergeant & they had a dau, Phoebe Sergeant who m (1) Lawrece Lea son of William Lea (1st cousin q.v.) She m (2) Samuel Bowers (Ref. Edwin Holmes Lea d 1917)."

Source: Amite County, Mississippi 1699-1890 (Volume #3): The Environs, Albert Eugene Casey (1957) at 553-554.
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Arkansas Wills & Probate Records 1818-1998; Monroe Cty Wills-Records Vol 1 A-B 1830-1865 pg 229/587 ancestry viewer: Will of Phebe Bowers, dated 12/27/1849- names Daughters Artamissia Lee, Phoebe R Sargent. Son Lemuel S Bowers, grandson Edward Green Bowers & granddaughter Rebecca Sargent. Will probated Dec 27, 1850.
 
Sargent, Phoebe (I30683)
 
38 "(4) Polly Lea married James Seargent and their daughter Phebe married her cousin Lawrence Lea."

Source: The Heritage of Caswell County, North Carolina, Jeannine D. Whitlow, Editor (1985) at 351 (Article #437, "James Lea" by Katharine Kerr Kendall).
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Mary "Polly", (b. @ 1752) m. James Sergant, (son of"Old" William Sergant) & Sarah (Lea?). Large family. Most migrate to TN. Dau. Phebe m. Lawrence, 23 Sep 1793. m. 2nd, Samuel Bowers, moves to AL.
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" Polly Lea dau of James & Anne Lea of Leasburg b c 1752, m James Sergeant & they had a dau, Phoebe Sergeant who m (1) Lawrece Lea son of William Lea (1st cousin q.v.) She m (2) Samuel Bowers (Ref. Edwin Holmes Lea d 1917)."

Source: Amite County, Mississippi 1699-1890 (Volume #3): The Environs, Albert Eugene Casey (1957) at 554. 
Lea, Mary (I3815)
 
39 ". . . There are issues related to the Fuqua line that are troubling. The parents of William Fuqua (m. Frankie Dunivant, 1792) are not known, although he is in the generation of the great-grandchildren of Guillaume Fouquet. He lived most of his married life in rural Caswell County, North Carolina. There is no record of land ownership so he may have been a sharecropper, supporting the family legend that we descend from sharecroppers. His daughter, Mary Fuqua, never married and had several out-of-wedlock children, the first at the age of twelve. Several of her daughters had out-of-wedlock children, including Fannie (Frances) who never married. This means that for two generations from 150 to 200 years ago, fatherhood was not identified and the family name was maintained by females. Even though this is not what you want to find when you research for ancestors, you must acknowledge that it is history and should appreciate the progress that has been made in the family over the last 150 years. It seems apparent that Fannie's second son, John Henry (my great-grandfather), started to upgrade the family genetically when he married Henrietta Brooks, a physician's daughter, probably the first literate person in the family. The generations that have followed in my line seem to have continued this upgrade through marriage, although I doubt that these were pragmatic decisions. It was Henrietta who changed the spelling of our name to Fuquay, perhaps to start a new genetic line. She may have instilled in the family an appreciation for the value of education. Both of her sons were literate. Two of her grandchildren earned college degrees (including my father) as did at least seven of her great-grandchildren with one earning a law degree and another a Ph.D. We never heard much about Henrietta when I was growing up, perhaps because she died before most of her grandchildren were born, but I believe that she is due a great deal of credit for the progress that has been made in the family over the last 125 years."
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1850 United States Federal Census
Name: Mary Fugua
Age: 50
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1800
Birth Place: Virginia
Gender: Female
Home in 1850 (City,County,State): Caswell, North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
Mary Fugua 50
John Fugua 34
Francis Fugua 30 (Frances Fuqua)
Elizabeth P Fugua 25
Martha Fugua 21
Margaret C Fugua 18
Augustin W Fugua 6
Pinckney Fugua 3
John H Dunivant 18
Alexander Dunivant 13

1860 United States Federal Census
Name: Betsy Fuqua
Age in 1860: 34
Birth Year: abt 1826
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1860: Caswell, North Carolina
Gender: Female
Post Office: Yanceyville
Occupation: Seamstress
Household Members: Name Age
Betsy Fuqua 34
Emiline Fuqua 33
William Fuqua 13
Eliza Fuqua 6
Henry Fuqua 3
Fannie Fuqua 2

1870 United States Federal Census
Name: Elizabeth Dunivant
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1834
Age in 1870: 36
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1870: Yanceyville, Caswell, North Carolina
Race: White
Gender: Female
Post Office: Yanceyville
Household Members: Name Age
Thomas Dunivant 35
Elizabeth Dunivant 36
Hersey Dunivant 7 (possibly Henry)
Martha Dunivant 5
Eliza Fuqua 14
Fannie Fuqua 12

She purportedly had three children out-of-wedlock before marrying Thomas Dunnivant in 1866. 
Fuqua, Elizabeth P. (I24732)
 
40 ". . . There are issues related to the Fuqua line that are troubling. The parents of William Fuqua (m. Frankie Dunivant, 1792) are not known, although he is in the generation of the great-grandchildren of Guillaume Fouquet. He lived most of his married life in rural Caswell County, North Carolina. There is no record of land ownership so he may have been a sharecropper, supporting the family legend that we descend from sharecroppers. His daughter, Mary Fuqua, never married and had several out-of-wedlock children, the first at the age of twelve. Several of her daughters had out-of-wedlock children, including Fannie (Frances) who never married. This means that for two generations from 150 to 200 years ago, fatherhood was not identified and the family name was maintained by females. Even though this is not what you want to find when you research for ancestors, you must acknowledge that it is history and should appreciate the progress that has been made in the family over the last 150 years. It seems apparent that Fannie's second son, John Henry (my great-grandfather), started to upgrade the family genetically when he married Henrietta Brooks, a physician's daughter, probably the first literate person in the family. The generations that have followed in my line seem to have continued this upgrade through marriage, although I doubt that these were pragmatic decisions. It was Henrietta who changed the spelling of our name to Fuquay, perhaps to start a new genetic line. She may have instilled in the family an appreciation for the value of education. Both of her sons were literate. Two of her grandchildren earned college degrees (including my father) as did at least seven of her great-grandchildren with one earning a law degree and another a Ph.D. We never heard much about Henrietta when I was growing up, perhaps because she died before most of her grandchildren were born, but I believe that she is due a great deal of credit for the progress that has been made in the family over the last 125 years." Fuqua, Martha (I24784)
 
41 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2387)
 
42 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I48695)
 
43 "A Lost Art" by John Turk

While few would find fault with the ease of communication afforded by e-mail, texting, and twittering, those of us who study history understand that there are other aspects of communication that have been lost. Letter-writing seems to be becoming a thing of the past. Even handwriting (as once aught in public schools) is quickly becoming a lost art. In WNCHA's collections are several autograph books once owned by the descendants or in-laws of William Wallace McDowell and his wife, Sarah Lucinda McDowell--former owners of the Smith-McDowell House.

We docents at the museum like to show school children on tours examples from these books. "This, my young friends," we say, "is what handwriting looks like." They are always amazed. And we explain that what they are seeing was done with ink purchased at a local store and with a pen that was not all that different from the pen used to sign the Declaration of Independence. In addition, there was no such thing as erasing a mistake. As you were working with ink, there were no "do overs."

One of the autograph books was once the pride and joy of Ella Gertrude Graham (1862-1931). She was the wife of John Hardy McDowell and daughter-in-law of William and Sarah. It is what was known as a floral album. Every other page contains a color rendering of a different flower. The title page offers a guide to flowers and their meaning: geraniums stand for confidence, lilacs for first love.

Ella's book is not filled with the autographs of famous people. Rather it is simply a collection of signatures of friends and acquaintances. Many are dated, and most are accompanied by poems or words of wisdom. Some are true works of art--or, perhaps, examples of Victorian excess. M. M. Lemmond surrounded his signature with an enchanting bird on a nest with a ribbon in its beak. It shows exquisite changes in pen pressure and speed. G. N. Smithdeal of Salisbury, N.C.'s autograph, dated August 28, 1882, features scrolling branches and two birds, one atop a quill-tipped pen. The inscription reads: "May angels crown the with immortal flowers."

With today's emphasis on speed and its loss of concern regarding spelling, punctuation, sentence structure, or general neatness--not to mention its fascination with texting, shorthand (such as LOL for "laughing out loud) it is difficult to imagine a world where one could take half an hour or more simply to sign one's name.

Several of the autograph books are on display in the front parlor and the 1870s bedroom of the [Smith-McDowell House] museum. Ella McDowell's, because of its delicate condition, is housed in the museum's archives, but may be viewed upon request.

Source: WNCHA News: Newsletter of the Western North Carolina Historical Association, September/October 2011, Page 3. 
Graham, Ella Gertrude (I23630)
 
44 "A Tribute to the Late Grasty Crews," The Register (Danville, Virginia), Friday, 2 November 1951. This article revealed that John Grasty Crews practiced law in Danville, Virginia, served as President of Danville Power and Traction Company, was a Democrat involved in both local and state politics, and once chaired the Danville Electoral Board. Crews, John Grasty (I69559)
 
45 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I18408)
 
46 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I59414)
 
47 "Adeline Lea, called Addie, was born in Farmville Va. in 1842. After finishing school here she went to school in Richmond Va. for one term. She was very gifted in music. During the Civil War she taught in a private family in Patrick Co. Va., for a year. Later she taught in Dr. Charles Deems school at Wilson N.C. Soon after the war, she went to Jackson, Tenn. to teach music in Uncle Lorenzo's school there, in which also Prof. B. L. Arnold, a native Virginian, taught mathematics. The intimate association resulted in marriage, which was sonsummated in 1867. Their union was a short one, Addie, in 1871, dying very suddenly in Bolivar Tenn, where Mr. Arnold taught after leaving Jackson, leaving 2 children, the oldest Harry, 3 years old, and a baby, John Marshall, 8 months. (The baby lived only 2 weeks after his mother's death.)

"I was in Tenn. at the time and Mr. Arnold with me brought the children east. I took charge of the baby and he carried Harry to his father's home in Va. Harry, a year later, was brought here to stay with us. He, after his education and spending many years in the army lives now in Oregon to which state his father went soon after Addie's death. Mr. Arnold was President of a College at Corvallis, Oregon. After Addie's death he married again, Minnie White. They had one son, Ernest, who was highly educated and very musical. He lost his life when about 25 years of age, I suppose."

Source: Lea, Wilhelmina. Reminiscences of Miss Willie Lea. Copied from Manuscript in Possession of Mrs. M. H. Moore (Weaverville, North Carolina). Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill, North Carolina). June 1943. Mostly a narrative account of her family, with biographical data, dates, and relationships, written in the 1930s. Typescript was made in 1943 from a manuscript lent by Mrs. W. S. Dixon. 
Arnold, John Marshall (I59415)
 
48 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I59416)
 
49 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I59417)
 
50 "And lastly to the north marked R was the home of Griffin Gunn whose widow Dorothy married John C. Harvey, one of the town's first commissioners. The other commissioners were Col. Thomas Graves, Thomas D. Johnston, Paul A. Haralson, and Dr. Allen Gunn. Dr. Gunn had purchased land marked S above to build his home. It was purchased from Thomas D. Johnston."

Source: The Heritage of Caswell County, North Carolina, Jeannine D. Whitlow, Editor (1985) at 76 ("Yanceyville 1833-1839" by Katharine Kerr Kendall).

It is possible that John C. Harvey was married a third time. The following marriage bond record has not been confirmed as applicable to the John C. Harvey of this entry and is placed here for research purposes only:

Groom: John C. Harvey
Bride: Susan M. Hodges (widow)
Bond Date: 11 January 1864
Bondsman/Witness: John Kerr
Location: Caswell County, North Carolina
Source: Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1981) at 44.
 
Harvey, John C. (I40363)
 

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